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The Deli Philly’s July Record of the Month: Patience - Mannequin Pussy





The Deli Philly’s July Record of the Month: Patience - Mannequin Pussy

The quartet of Mannequin Pussy, which is made of Marisa Dabice (guitar & vocals), Athanasios Paul (guitar & keys), Kaleen Reading (drums & percussion), and Colins Rey Regisford (bass, samples & vocals), has returned with its third album. Patience was produced by Will Yip, and is now available via Epitaph.

Aggression and tension melodically converge on the album’s title track. From the initial jarring jumpstart of guitar that sets things in motion, the song lyrically expresses a shift in perspective within a relationship – one that depicts insecurity in the form of possessiveness. “Who told you, that my body was yours to own? Long before you called, it was crawling through the wild.” “Patience” fuses enthusiastic energy, evaluating circumstances, and emerging resilience.

With “Drunk II,” the tone is set by hard-driving rhythms and searing, smooth guitar lines. Marisa Dabice’s vocals cut in a vulnerable, revealing manner. “I’ve been going out almost every night, I’ve been drinking everything I can get my hands on, I pretend I have fun.” A lingering sadness hovers as Dabice describes projecting strength, while internal doubts remain. “And everyone says to me, ‘Missy, you're so strong!’ But what if I don't wanna be? And everyone says to me, ‘Missy, how do you stand it?’ There’s so much that you don't see.” 
 
“Cream” races forward in a raw, frenetic manner, as Dabice expresses, “I was standing in the gates of my hell. I was looking at myself like, ‘Girl, what you did, take a look at yourself right now!” Backed by Kaleen Reading’s tenacious percussion, the moment seems to represent a pivotal point of change, which rips and roars like an inferno. In contrast, “Fear/+/Desire” exhibits a gentler side of the band. The aesthetic is reinforced by the softness of the vocals, which is juxtaposed by the painful dynamic of the relationship. “You beg me to build you a monument, and as it grew, oh so did all my regret. Is this what you wanted? Does holding me down make you feel desire?” Recalling the need to escape an abusive situation, the protagonist concludes that “possession is a demon that I never meant to keep.”

 A fiery riff is complemented by raging percussion on “Drunk I,” as a limit is reached. “What kind of woman would you rather I be? Docile and waiting to breed? I’d rather be that. My heart is racing, wrapped up, and no, I’m not afraid.” Keeping things short, and not so sweet. A solemn, haunting instrumental opening develops the mood of “High Horse”. Painting an exit scene from a tumultuous setting, the instruments gradually swell, developing tension before momentously spilling over and crashing down. “Someone who wouldn’t treat me like you do, I fucked up. How many times will you beg me to? Your worlds on fire, as I watch up from my high horse. Your worlds on fire, and I walk away.”

“Who You Are” embraces the current moment, while describing self-acceptance. “If I were you, there’s not a thing I would restart. I love who you are.” Then, about halfway through, the tempo accelerates establishing a sense of urgency. “I felt the earth move, in your eyes. I get excited by your side. I know they want to get you to be the kind of person they’d rather see, but you don’t have to change.” There’s a high-speed intensity that exudes a cathartic control.

On “Clams,” Dabice trades verses with Regisford, as heavy percussion forge a combative sound seen through a financial scope. “I fought, but I did not win…I just want my money.” “F.U.C.A.W” captures an uncompromising in your face moment, as the guitar cuts and the drums bash. “What did you say to me boy? Come on and spit it in my face.” 

“In Love Again” closes the record on an optimistic note. Keys mingle while the other instruments establish a bright bounce. Then, everything drops back isolating and highlighting the thoughts and vocals. “Oh, it keeps getting better. I cried out, and fell out the center. I’m so high; I want this forever.” When the instruments re-enter, a joyous blitz ensues.

Patience shines in its candid openness, exploring personal struggles, demonstrating the strength to break through and remain optimistic about what the future has in store. –Michael Colavita

This Emerging Artist is based in Philadelphia,
check out other talented locals we picked
for our Philadelphia Artist of the Month poll below!

         
Which of these local acts should be The Deli Philly's featured artist(s)?
Total: 289 votes
  Arch Of Love 
  Cold Soul 
  Dr. Doper 
  Matt Kelly 
  Sam Silbert 

This poll will end on August 31, 2019 at 11.59 PM ET

Please stay positive with the comments, support for other bands is one of the secrets of "success."

Results as of August 26, 2019, 1:23 am

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