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Artist of the Month
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May 2016
Residuels
"Love Songs
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Philly rock ‘n’ rollers Justin Pittney, Mike Cammarata, and Kyle Garvey (a.k.a. Residuels) revamp essential garage cuts on their latest release Love Songs. Available now via Suicide Bong Tapes, the three-piece’s cassette kick-starts with a full-throttle rendition of Rich Berry’s “Have Love, Will Travel.” The power trio’s frenetic take on the song that put bands like Thee Headcoatees and Paul Revere & the Raiders on the map is far from derivative. From the very first lick of guitar, Pittney and his bandmates tap into the original fury at the center of “Have Love Will Travel,” using crashing riffs and uninhibited vocals reminiscent of The Gories.
 
Residuels’ take on The Damned’s debut single “New Rose” is similarly inventive, giving listeners an unadulterated taste of the original song’s rhythm and fuzz. Pittney channels Dave Vanian with ease, mimicking the legendary Londoner’s punk-as-fuck diction as if he wrote the track himself. Clocking in at a few seconds shy of three minutes, the second track on Love Songs is arguably one of the best renditions of the ‘76 single.
 
The same could be said for “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” Opening with a guttural scream, the group’s tribute to psych-rock icons The 13th Floor Elevators is perfectly executed, with each chord and clash of cymbal adding to the instrumented intensity of the already well-loved garage classic. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” feels like a stubborn tantrum, the sonic manifestation of the sort of longing that is borne of desperation and pure desire that is mirrored in the album’s closer “It Girl.” Residuels’ jangly styling of one the most lovelorn (and heart-wrenching) tracks on The Brian Jonestown Massacre's fifth LP is equally captivating, despite being one of Love Song’s quietest tracks, leaving listeners smitten. For die-hard fans of garage rock and newcomers alike, Love Songs doesn’t just pay homage to the genre’s past; it celebrates its vibrant present. - Dianca London

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scene blog

Album Review: Get Disowned - Hop Along

Album Review: Get Disowned - Hop Along

A simple interwoven electric guitar riff accents rough, acoustic guitar strums, and then singer/songwriter Frances Quinlan’s wispy, lilting vocals enter the equation like a glimpse of sunlight parting the clouds of an overcast sky. Thus, begins Hop Along’s latest full-length album Get Disowned.
 
Opener “Some Grace,” a subtle bare-boned introduction, shares a bit of the fragility and vulnerability that can be found in Quinlan’s lyrics. The song morphs into faint electronic bleeps dissolving into a serene calm. However, the pending storm arises with the following track and the album’s lead single “Tibetan Pop Stars,” which cuts through the tranquility with boisterously dirty power chords and rolling thunder drumbeats. Once again, the vocals seem to play peacemaker, a calming force among the turmoil. That is, until the chorus takes flight, then falls to earth with the repeated lines “nobody deserves you the way that I do,” which gradually rises from the ashes of a broken heart. “No Good Al Joad” is paced by steady downhill bursts of acoustic guitar that is pierced by the interloping hammer of a pickaxe electric guitar. Quinlan’s vocals strain in an effect that expresses the emotive tug and pull of the narrative. This all comes to a head after a brief percussive interlude, which captures the ear signaling for audience participation. She reveals, “You are my favorite, because you are a long shot. You are my enemy, because you forgot.” This is just before pulling back into a corner to protect herself as she gathers the strength to share a bit of philosophical wisdom and universal truth: “Everybody is a little hard to love sometimes.”
 
With the precise production work of Algernon Cadwallader’s Joe Reinhart, Get Disowned is a balance between agitated artillery-style rock with intimate, late night confessional vocals that dig their nails into your skin while simultaneously whispering sweet nothings into your ear. Despite the constant presence of distinctly tenacious guitar thrashes, Quinlan’s lyrical message remains a priority. It is often aided by the fact that the vocals are directed at the listener. In this manner, Hop Along invites us into an emotionally turbulent household leaving no curtains drawn or door locked.
 
You can purchase Get Disowned via Hot Green Records. Hop Along will also be celebrating its release tomorrow night at The First Unitarian with Bandname, Little Big League and Mary Lattimore. - Michael Colavita

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