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Norwegian Arms





Photo Recap: Work Drugs & Norwegian Arms at Morgan's Pier

Last night was good opportunity to grab some drinks by the water at Morgan's Pier and listen to a couple of rising local acts, Work Drugs and Norwegian Arms. After some technical difficuties early on in the evening, things got smooth. Check out some sweet shots from the evening HERE! (Photo by Zach Blum)

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Photo Recap: Work Drugs & Norwegian Arms at Morgan's Pier 

- by Zach Blum

Work Drugs

 

Norwegian Arms

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

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R5’s Free Concert Series w/Work Drugs & Norwegian Arms at Morgan’s Pier July 10

If you don’t have plans or the cash to hit the big Belle and Sebastian/Yo La Tengo show tonight at the Mann Center, then I better see you at Morgan’s Pier for R5’s free concert series with local indie darlings Work Drugs and Norwegian Arms. Let’s be honest. Summertime and drinks by the water surrounded by yachts is what Work Drugs’ music was made for, well, that and sweet, sweet love-makin’, which might happen too if you come out. ;o) The guys and gal recently dropped their rad new full-length album Mavericks so this evening is a good opportunity for you to hear your favorite tunes from it live and grab your own copy directly from the band. Opening the hang will be weirdo folksters Norwegian Arms, who play with such passion that you can’t help being pulled into their world. You’ll also get a chance to check out what they’ve been working on lately since the release of their debut LP Wolf Like a Stray Dog. It’s a locals only night at Morgan’s Pier - just the way that we like it! Morgan’s Pier, 221 N. Columbus Blvd., 9pm, Free, 21+ (Photo by Brandi Lukas) - Q.D. Tran 


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Where Is My Mind?: Norwegian Arms’ Brendan Mulvihill

I sat down for a drink and chat at Fishtown Tavern with Norwegian Arms’ Brendan Mulvihill a couple of months back to talk about his band winning The Deli Philly’s most recent Best Emerging Artist Poll, SXSW and more. Unfortunately, my crazy work schedule and life took over, and I didn’t get a chance to transcribe the interview until now. (BTW: Is there any software that can accurately do transcription for me yet?) You can read how our discussion went HERE. And don’t forget to swing by Dock Street Brewing Co. this Sunday afternoon for their free annual Philly Beer Week Music Fest with performances by Norwegian Arms, On the Water, Post Sun Times and Bomple plus plenty of tasty brews, pizzas and games!

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Where Is My Mind?: Norwegian Arms' Brendan Mulvihill

- by Q.D. Tran

I sat down for a drink and chat at Fishtown Tavern with Norwegian Arms’ Brendan Mulvihill a couple of months back to talk about his band winning The Deli Philly’s most recent Best Emerging Artist Poll, SXSW and more. Unfortunately, my crazy work schedule and life took over, and I didn’t get a chance to transcribe the interview until now. (BTW: Is there any software that can accurately do transcription for me yet?) You can read how our discussion went below. And don’t forget to swing by Dock Street Brewing Co. this Sunday afternoon for their free annual Philly Beer Week Music Fest with performances by Norwegian Arms, On the WaterPost Sun Times and Bomple plus plenty of tasty brews, pizzas and games!
 
The Deli: The last time we did an interview was right before your Album Release/Mayan Apocalypse Party. How did that go?
 
Brendan Mulvihill: That was awesome. I don’t know how to describe it. The ice cream was delicious, and the show was wonderful. It was super packed, and the world didn’t end. I guess that is all you could hope for, right?
 
TD: How has the response been with the new album?
 
BM: Um…I guess that there is always a question of the reality and my personal expectations. Basically, it’s gotten more support than I ever thought it would have had from online outlets and stuff. It seemed to reach some places that I really didn’t anticipate. But of course, you are always like “How can I get this in more people’s ears?” Yeah, but I would say it has been beyond my wildest expectations. But it’s like a slow build. Most nice things, but there are some people that said Animal Collective should sue us. (laughs) Yeah, like internet troll type people. And of course, you take that as it comes. And if they sued me, that would be pretty cool too.
 
TD: Are you a fan of Animal Collective?
 
BM: Oh yeah - absolutely. I mean. It would be a complete lie for me to say that my music isn’t influenced by them - that sort of type of rawness and sterile quality to it. And it’s the things like that I like. But yeah, I don’t think that it is a complete rip off. Obviously, I’m not them so I can’t write the same music as them so it’s an actual impossibility.
 
TD: Have you been working on any new music at all?
 
BM: Yeah, yeah - I’ve been working on new stuff. There are things that I’ve been tending over the last few years since I wrote the songs on the record. Some of them are from the times I spent in South America. Some of them aren’t. Before the basis for our material was based on my travels or whatever or experiences elsewhere. So far, this material is a little bit of both - a little bit of hometown inspiration plus stuff from abroad.
 
TD: In comparison of how you write abroad and at home, what are the differences and influences? Is there any difference?
 
BM: Yeah, I think that there is a huge difference. I think that when I’m away and in a new environment or place, it is infinitely easier to notice the small things and feel inspired by what I would consider inane events here just because here the mundane is what I’m used to everyday. I’m trying to kind of back away from that, especially when I’m at home. The thing is when I write abroad, it is my reaction to things that I have never encountered before like a culture shock experience. It’s kind of like a cultural comparison or even a story like me doing something somewhere. Here, it’s actually a little bit frightening I think sometimes. I think that the stuff that I am writing about home and while I’m at home is more self-reflective to say it is influenced by a more personal emotional thing. I think. Nothing is really finished yet. I think that is why I use travel as a means to feel inspired. It’s easier.
 
TD: Is the new stuff influenced by your band members?
 
BM: Um…thing is that it’s still following the traditional paradigm where I kind of work on songs that I felt and kind of bring it to the table. I have yet to bring them to the table. There are two songs that I guess are new. But they are not newly written. They are from before.
 
TD: “Iceman”?
 
BM: Yeah, “Iceman” is way old, and then there is another one called “Visions of My Father” that is actually a song that didn’t make the album cut. We couldn’t figure out how to record it, but we’ve been playing that one live. Just like the last set of songs, I make a basic structure - you know - I write the songs for all intents and purposes. Then, I am assuming that they’ll be modified. That’s what always ends up happening anyways.
 
TD: How was your first tour to SXSW and back?
 
BM: It was good. It was our first tour beyond regional touring. It was the first time we got to head off into the horizon. It was nice and cool experience. As a band, we got to play every day, and we hadn’t done that so I was interested to see how that would work out. I have a tendency to cut my fingers and sing myself hoarse so it was also an exercise in restraint.
 
TD: Did any of that happen?
 
BM: Absolutely, it happened the first day. From then on, I had to be careful. And everything ended up working out ok in the end.
 
TD: You had [Michael] Chadwick (ex-Armchairs) on tour with you on drums instead of Eric [Slick]. How did that go?
 
BM: It was great. He’s a really good friend of mine, and he engineered the record, and helped produce it so he was a good fit and an ideal scenario.
 
TD: I was thinking about this when you started getting more popular. You would eventually be on the road. Is that something that Eric would be able to do?
 
BM: It’s an ongoing discussion. Basically, it seems to me that when he can and he’s not completely worn out from everything else that he is doing - yeah. Obviously, I don’t want to overextend him. That’s his career - you know. I don’t want to keep him from making money or maintaining his existence. Because we haven’t had any other tours, it’s kind of hard to say how things are going to be. But for the time being, that’s how it’s going to be. Like “can you do this?” Or maybe, “no I can’t. Ok, cool.”
 
TD: Do you have a backup drummer?
 
BM: There are a couple of people that we’ve worked with who have volunteered so there is no shortage. Obviously, none of it is the same as having Eric there. Eric is also there to bring them up to speed so he is present in spirit - you know.
 
TD: So winning The Deli Philly’s most recent Best Emerging Artist Poll - were you really surprised?
 
BM: Yeah, I had no idea. Yeah, that was a super weird day. It was awesome obviously. It was cool that happened. I don’t completely understand how, but it did. If anything, it was really nice to see a significant amount of support from within the local music community.
 
TD: You and Hop Along were neck and neck for a while. We kept getting votes in, and were like “oh shit - there’s Hop Along; oh shit - there’s Norwegian Arms!” It went back and forth for a while.
 
BM: I was absolutely surprised. I was very flattered. It felt like an affirmation, but at the same time, I felt a lot of gratitude.
 

 

 

 

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Norwegian Arms
Wolf Like a Stray Dog

 

 
 
 
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