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Work Drugs





New Music Video: “The Art of Progress” - Work Drugs

Below is a “new” beach party music video from Work Drugs just in time to help you soak in the last days of summer so grind out to “The Art of Progress” off their latest album Absolute Bearing. You can download the track for free HERE. They are scheduled to perform next in Philly on August 31 at Johnny Brenda’s with City Rain and Cold Fronts. (Photo by Brandi Lukas)

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Work Drugs Release New Album Today!

Work Drugs just dropped their second official “smooth-fi” LP Absolute Bearing today. You can groove out to the record in its entirety below, and purchase it HERE (it’s also available on limited edition hand-made CDs - ha…how retro ;o). They’ll be performing next on Sunday, July 22 at the XPoNential Music Festival in Camden.

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New Music Video: “Pluto” - Work Drugs

Below is a new music video from Work Drugs for the track “Pluto.” The song appears on their forthcoming album Absolute Bearing, which will be released on July 10 and will be available to download or on handmade CDs. You can also cop the new single for free HERE.

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Recap & Photos: Work Drugs & Grimace Federation Opening for Battles at TLA

Rain fell at a leisurely pace this past Tuesday night on South Street, but the weather couldn’t dampen the spirit of the crowd that had gathered at the Theatre of the Living Arts to hear Philly natives Work Drugs’ laidback dance grooves, a rare DJ set from Grimace Federation, and of course, Brooklyn’s trio of musical intensity aptly named Battles.

Wes Schwartz from Grimace Federation led the way by helping to set the mood conjuring up dance-y beats from behind his MacBook Pro, gear and wires that were set up at the right side of the stage. Schwartz (being a lover of electronica and obscure underground hip hop) laid down soundscapes and segues that naturally flowed and fit the vibe of the evening. He was also assisted by Grimace Federation’s bassist Jim Calverese, who added his sonic flourishes on the MPC sampler. The band will be in full-effect for their every other week Wednesday night summer residency at Kung Fu Necktie starting July 18.

Work Drugs took over the stage next with their simple infectious grooves that methodically swept through the audience. The symptoms progressed in the following order. Initially, the hazy rhythms of songs like “Flying Zambo” and “Third Wave” implored you into a state of relaxation releasing the built-up tension from a long day. Once the body was set free; the mind followed suit. The multi-voiced whispers of the line “Static starts to break through” in  “Flying Zambo” hypnotically engaged the onlookers while the pulsating beats and question of “Whatever happened to brotherly?” in “Physical Acts” roused the locals. The up-tempo percussion of “License to Drive” melded extremely well with the cool injection of guitar quickly gaining the crowd’s approval.

Shortly after the conclusion of Work Drugs’ set, Battles hit the stage and the energy in the room skyrocketed. Drummer John Stanier was flanked on each side by keyboardist/guitarist Ian Williams and bassist/guitarist Dave Konopka. Kicking off their set with “Africastle,” the band jumped out of the gate at a sprinter’s pace and never looked backed. The beginning of “Africastle” combined tiptoeing keys with stirring guitar work that seemed to instruct the rest of the outfit before heavy-hitting drums crashed the party and the full-on musical assault began. While some bands demonstrate a nonchalant attitude, this trio continuously advanced - not settling for brief flashes of heat, instead building a sonic fire as each member fanned the flames. Williams played a balancing act between a pair of keyboards while interjecting guitar riffs, and Konopka demonstrated similar dexterity handling bass and guitar duties. Stanier’s unrelenting attack on the drum kit was a sight to behold. On the few tracks that contained vocals such as “Atlas,” “Ice Cream,” or “My Machines” the vocalist were projected on monitors, which were synced to the set throughout the evening adding visual simulation to the aural experience. No amount of precipitation could put out Battles’ fire on this evening.

You can check out our photos from all three sets HERE.
 
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Recap & Photos: Work Drugs & Grimace Federation Opening for Battles at TLA

- by Michael Colavita (Words) & Brandi Lukas (Photos)

Rain fell at a leisurely pace this past Tuesday night on South Street, but the weather couldn’t dampen the spirit of the crowd that had gathered at the Theatre of the Living Arts to hear Philly natives Work Drugs’ laidback dance grooves, a rare DJ set from Grimace Federation, and of course, Brooklyn’s trio of musical intensity aptly named Battles.
 
Wes Schwartz from Grimace Federation led the way by helping to set the mood conjuring up dance-y beats from behind his MacBook Pro, gear and wires that were set up at the right side of the stage. Schwartz (being a lover of electronica and obscure underground hip hop) laid down soundscapes and segues that naturally flowed and fit the vibe of the evening. He was also assisted by Grimace Federation’s bassist Jim Calverese, who added his sonic flourishes on the MPC sampler. The band will be in full-effect for their every other week Wednesday night summer residency at Kung Fu Necktie starting July 18.
 
Work Drugs took over the stage next with their simple infectious grooves that methodically swept through the audience. The symptoms progressed in the following order. Initially, the hazy rhythms of songs like “Flying Zambo” and “Third Wave” implored you into a state of relaxation releasing the built-up tension from a long day. Once the body was set free; the mind followed suit. The multi-voiced whispers of the line “Static starts to break through” in  “Flying Zambo” hypnotically engaged the onlookers while the pulsating beats and question of “Whatever happened to brotherly?” in “Physical Acts” roused the locals. The up-tempo percussion of “License to Drive” melded extremely well with the cool injection of guitar quickly gaining the crowd’s approval.
 
Shortly after the conclusion of Work Drugs’ set, Battles hit the stage and the energy in the room skyrocketed. Drummer John Stanier was flanked on each side by keyboardist/guitarist Ian Williams and bassist/guitarist Dave Konopka. Kicking off their set with “Africastle,” the band jumped out of the gate at a sprinter’s pace and never looked backed. The beginning of “Africastle” combined tiptoeing keys with stirring guitar work that seemed to instruct the rest of the outfit before heavy-hitting drums crashed the party and the full-on musical assault began. While some bands demonstrate a nonchalant attitude, this trio continuously advanced - not settling for brief flashes of heat, instead building a sonic fire as each member fanned the flames. Williams played a balancing act between a pair of keyboards while interjecting guitar riffs, and Konopka demonstrated similar dexterity handling bass and guitar duties. Stanier’s unrelenting attack on the drum kit was a sight to behold. On the few tracks that contained vocals such as “Atlas,” “Ice Cream,” or “My Machines” the vocalist were projected on monitors, which were synced to the set throughout the evening adding visual simulation to the aural experience. No amount of precipitation could put out Battles’ fire on this evening.
 
 
Grimace Federation (DJ Set)
 
 
 
 
 
Work Drugs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Battles
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Photos by Brandi Lukas)
 

 

 

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