x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

Alt Rock





Alt Rock

Time: 
20:00
Band name: 
Eli Winter
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/eliwintermusic
Venue name: 
Hideout Online
|




Trace of Lime knows how to entertain in their new music video "Creature of Habit"

 

Do you remember when The Mighty Mighty Bosstones and No Doubt were on the radio? When music videos were full of bright colors, weird angles, and sometimes flannel? Trace of Lime has achieved a nostalgia usually only brought on by watching a 90s hits playlist on Youtube. From the first second the video "Creature of Habit" started  till the last, I was drawn in to both old memories and admiration for the new music this amazing city is harboring. It's bands and music like this that made me want to start writing about them, and Trace of Like has only anchored the hope I've held for what Austin bands can bring us all.

 

These guys are fun, energetic, creative in every video from "Business" with a unique twist on the fable of "The Three Little Pigs"  to the out right blatancy of color in "Creature of Habit". There's always an obvious yet fun statement being made with every video they seem to do. "Creature of Habit" is "about dealing with things inevitably changing around you" the band says. A topic all too familiar today with Austinites dealing with Covid and our evolving city.

 

The video was written and directed by Jordan Karam, Trace of Limes lead Vocalist, who you see submerged in a solid world changing around him in the video. Dusana Risovic directed the video after hashing out the details with the band. "We wanted something visual to move the story, and chose red and blue because of their dynamic differences." In my personal opinion, this was an absolutely brilliant way to convey the message and keep up the pattern of fun play the band seems so good at doing.

 

Currently Trace of Lime are not playing any live shows, which has me screaming louder into the Universe to "PLEASE GIVE US LIVE SHOWS BACK!!!!!" It is an absolute travesty that a band so good as these guys, has to be quarantined away, fearfully until 2021. They are however, planning to finish work on their current album and have already started planning out the next fun video for us all to enjoy. Until then, check out "Creature of Habit" on YouTube, follow the guys on the social places @traceoflime, and keep your fingers crossed that we all get to see these guys play live again soon.


 

-Michael Lee

|




Mobley's New Single "Nobody's Favourite" Gets Rework by Foster The People

 

Fresh off announcing his multimedia collaboration, A Home Unfamiliar, which also doubles as a COVID-19 relief project, Austin artist Mobley is back with a Foster The People-led rework of his single, “Nobody’s Favourite.” 

 

Originally released as a single in February 2020, the “Nobody’s Favourite” rework is the anchoring single to Mobley’s new EP, Young & Dying in the Occident Supreme. Thought initially as a self-described “dancepunk number,” the Foster The People rework pulls away from the “punk” portion and pushes full-steam ahead towards the “dance” side of the original concept. 

 

Unintentionally or not, the original version of “Nobody’s Favourite” leans awfully heavily on a couple of teeter-totter guitar riffs quite similar to that of Tame Impala’s “The Less I Know The Better” and “Do I Wanna Know?” from The Arctic Monkeys. With the Foster rework, thought the riffs are still present, the track is reimagined in the shape of a punchy, hypnotic synth-pop dance track not out of place among the catalogs of the DFA label releases and Theophilus London.

 

As quickly as anything becomes relevant in 2020, it is buried beneath an unending pile of other; a song from February may as well be from another lifetime. For Mobley, the rework feels like a reminder, perhaps even a pang, of all the late, summery dance nights currently shelved (or relegated to Zoom) until further notice. 

 

-Benjamin Wiese

 

 

Photo credit: Andrew Bennett

 

 

|




The Band of Heathens Release Rousing New Single "Black Cat"

 

Quarantine failed to shoot a dose of productivity into our collective societal vein, but there are some among us who are managing to come out on the other side of the shutdown with something to show for the time spent. This month, The Band of Heathens uncage “Black Cat”, the stirring lead single previewing their seventh studio album, titled Stranger, due to be released this September.

The Heathens know a thing or two about serendipity; the three founding members shared billing at Momo’s as individual singer/songwriters and, according to bandmember Ed Jurdi, “organically” began playing together as The Good Time Supper Club. The band formed in earnest after a misprint in a local paper (and some clever guerilla marketing on behalf of ardent local fans) dubbed the group The Heathens, and the name stuck.

On “Black Cat”, The Heathens tackle serendipity of a more genealogical kind. As bandmember Gordy Quist tells it, “‘Black Cat’ is based on the true-ish legend of Augustinal Fonseca, the great-grandfather of an anonymous concertgoer.” The legend goes that Fonseca came through Ellis Island and discovered an “underground fighting ring in New York City around the turn of the last century” - and that he killed a panther in the ring after rising in the ranks. The Heathens are particularly adept at telling stories, true or otherwise, about strangers; considering the title of their forthcoming record, a special attribute of “Black Cat” is its nature as historical fiction in the very words of a stranger.

“Our friends at Song Confessional sent us the story from a ‘confession’ at the Newport Folk Festival,” Quist tells American Songwriter. The confessor claims to be Fonseca’s grandchild and that Fonseca lived to be 99 years old - and all the details unspool in the song, lovingly embellished by Quist’s pen. To helm production for the epic tale, The Heathens enlisted Portland native Tucker Martine, a former collaborator of The Decemberists and Modest Mouse.

“Black Cat” is fittingly slinky, with Quist’s mangled tenor navigating the sweeping drums in commanding sequences, framed by Jurdi’s falsetto issuing a stark reminder to the listener: “Know where you come from.” When focusing on where someone elsecame from, there is room to step back and breathe. Quist explains that the band is a “microcosm” next to their fans and that Strangeris a vehicle to demonstrate strangerhood within the music industry. If “Black Cat” is a harbinger for more lucid narrative-building from The Heathens, then we all might as well make ourselves comfortable.

-Mike Floeck

|




Listen to Atta Boy's "Shade" from upcoming long-awaited sophomore LP

After eight years since their last release, alt-Americana group Atta Boy will release their sophomore LP Big Heart Matters on September 11th. Following the surprise success of their debut Out of Sorts in 2012, Atta Boy's members pursued solo projects on both the West and East coasts, all the while coming up with ideas for a possible second record. They reconvened earlier this year to put together Big Heart Matters, and while times have made creating and releasing music difficult, Atta Boy have already put out two singles from the upcoming album. The first, "Devoted", hit streaming services in May, and the second, "Shade", came out in June. Both singles retain the folk feel of Out of Sorts, having the mood of the dog days of summer and the uncertainty of not just these past several months, but of life in general. With a big fan base behind them now, Atta Boy look forward to sharing the record with many more years of experience under their belts. Take a listen to "Shade" below, and look out for Big Heart Matters on September 11th. - Will Sisskind

|
|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...