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Artist of the Month
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May 2016
Residuels
"Love Songs
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Philly rock ‘n’ rollers Justin Pittney, Mike Cammarata, and Kyle Garvey (a.k.a. Residuels) revamp essential garage cuts on their latest release Love Songs. Available now via Suicide Bong Tapes, the three-piece’s cassette kick-starts with a full-throttle rendition of Rich Berry’s “Have Love, Will Travel.” The power trio’s frenetic take on the song that put bands like Thee Headcoatees and Paul Revere & the Raiders on the map is far from derivative. From the very first lick of guitar, Pittney and his bandmates tap into the original fury at the center of “Have Love Will Travel,” using crashing riffs and uninhibited vocals reminiscent of The Gories.
 
Residuels’ take on The Damned’s debut single “New Rose” is similarly inventive, giving listeners an unadulterated taste of the original song’s rhythm and fuzz. Pittney channels Dave Vanian with ease, mimicking the legendary Londoner’s punk-as-fuck diction as if he wrote the track himself. Clocking in at a few seconds shy of three minutes, the second track on Love Songs is arguably one of the best renditions of the ‘76 single.
 
The same could be said for “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” Opening with a guttural scream, the group’s tribute to psych-rock icons The 13th Floor Elevators is perfectly executed, with each chord and clash of cymbal adding to the instrumented intensity of the already well-loved garage classic. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” feels like a stubborn tantrum, the sonic manifestation of the sort of longing that is borne of desperation and pure desire that is mirrored in the album’s closer “It Girl.” Residuels’ jangly styling of one the most lovelorn (and heart-wrenching) tracks on The Brian Jonestown Massacre's fifth LP is equally captivating, despite being one of Love Song’s quietest tracks, leaving listeners smitten. For die-hard fans of garage rock and newcomers alike, Love Songs doesn’t just pay homage to the genre’s past; it celebrates its vibrant present. - Dianca London

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


New Youth Debuts with Perfect Spring Romance Single "Soft Eyes"

Looks like there's a new voice on the Austin synthpop scene, and boy is it a dreamy one. Solo artist New Youth, also known as Silas Acosta, has released his first single "Soft Eyes" this month, and it is a beautiful bit of lazy-day summer pop. Acosta is obviously a big fan of 80s pop, especially of the British synths and jangle guitars variety, and he layers airy elements of that lovely era on one another and over his breathy voice in the track in a way that speaks perfectly to the easy, carefree romance that the song's title calls to mind.

It's a song that will immediately appeal to the fan of 80s indie pop, as it will to anyone with a taste for the dreamy, and it's a very nice debut for this young artist. We're looking forward to seeing what else New Youth will bring to the table, hopefully soon, but until then, get a listen below to the song that well might be the soundtrack for a whole lot of Austin spring lovers this year.

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Each Track on the New EP from Slomo Drags Is a Pure Psychedelic Indiepop Joy

Slomo Drags' new EP out of Already Dead Tapes and Records is complex indie pop that's a little transgressive when it comes to the rules of that genre, and it's a record that should do a lot for the band's popularity both locally and nationally. In that way it reminds me heavily of Elephant 6, especially of Montreal, in its approach to rich song creation, this eponymous EP is five songs of gleefully busy psychedelic indie pop, and like that legendary band, Slomo Drags seems interested in making music to love this weird life to and does a great job accomplishing that goal here.

In addition to the “pretty + odd” thing full of anormal song structures and 60s influenced vocal layerings that they get from of Montreal, Slomo Drags also channels a few other classic 2000s indie acts here, including using big screechy Deerhoof-ish guitar wind-ups and a healthy dose of local funky indie with some Spoon-like attitude added to the sound. Now, if I were to have read that a current band was living in the spirit of these now-aging acts at their height, I'd have been a little worried that the sound in question wouldn't be as fresh or engaging as it once was, but it takes about five seconds of opener “Going Out of Business” to know that thought is dead wrong.

This kind of music is just as good and just as fun in 2016 as it was in the mid 2000s, mostly because Slomo Drags seriously know how to put together a shitlload of song elements nicely to make something that is crammed full of moving pieces, but which is tight and arranged in well-thought out way that guides you through the layers of musical activity with skill and grace. The expert construction of these tunes leaves you able to just focus on the fun of the album and ride on its central aesthetic. It's great fun each time you listen, and that structuring allows you to pick out great little parts to focus on with each play-through, as if the tracks taken together were a big, wild psychedelic party that you're viewing through a giddy first-person recording taken by the band, and they're showing you all these cool things happening for just a moment. For me at least, it creates a sense of a true, good, colorful fun time going on all around me, and that's a feeling that it's been a while since I got from modern indie music.

For a band to be able to create something as bursting with energy and slathered in creative layers as this EP is without things getting messy or completely breaking down, the members of that band have to be each be fully on top of their own musical game and yet still be totally in sync with each other member, and that's just the groove that Slomo Drags seems to be living comfortably inside of right now. This is a damn fine piece of pop music that both references and transcends the extensive history of the Venn diagram crossover between pop and indie rock, and it's one of the most thoroughly remarkable and enjoyable records out yet this year in Austin.

Listen below, and make sure to give every track a good once or twice over, because, in a way that feels directly rebellious to our current singles and SoundCloud culture, every track on here is seriously good stand-out music that could thrive on its own, but which does even better in the context of the whole record.

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Plato III's New Video "Womankind" Is About Praising the Goddess That Is Each Woman

A while back, Austin up-and-comer Plato III released a new track called "Womankind," a heady piece with a nice beat that puts the burden on men when it comes to our treatment of women in this world, which we thought was another very interesting and well-produced track for the budding artist. “Womankind” was a follow-up to the artist's killer take on fame that was track and video "Natalie Portman," and now Plato's kept up this pattern of releasing beautiful and poignant music videos for each of his few, but highly polished tracks by dropping a new video take on "Womankind."

The video here is, unsurprisingly, thoughtful and gorgeously rendered. It features a single stunning woman, presented as a being of intense power and beauty without referencing her sexually at all even, and this is difficult, when she is shown fully nude. The woman in question is shown dancing with confidence and skill through a raw natural setting, which doesn't feel like a contrast at all to her humanity, but instead feels exactly fitting. She's not fighting against nature, she is nature, a literal embodiment of it. That this woman is pregnant while moving like a lithe nature goddess isn't brought to the forefront of the video until the last half of the video, a powerful way to underscore the point of both track and video; that we've really stepped away as humans from valuing the incredible power and beauty of women outside of seeing them sexually. That they are our givers of life.

It's truly a nice piece of work both musically and in its film incarnation, and as such it's just more proof that Plato III is an artist worth both listening to and keeping an eye on. Put your own eyes to work below, and keep up with Plato at his Facebook page here, where he often gives meaningful commentary and context for his work.

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