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Artist of the Month
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September 2016
Them Jones
"A Mountain of Nonsense
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Philly rockers Them Jones craft far-out riffs and psych-drenched anthems, reviving and reinventing soundscapes reminiscent of the Age of Aquarius on their new LP A Mountain of Nonsense.

 

Beginning with the steady buzz of “Mended All Made Clean,” the five-piece's efforts make one take notice, as reverbed screams and gritty cymbals collide with satisfying repetition and impassioned diction. As if filling the narrative chasm between Mikal Cronin’s “Gone” and Ty Segall’s “Inside Your Heart,” Them Jones’ album opener sinks deep into the hearts of listeners without pretense or apology. “Hollow Man” captivates in a similar fashion by teaching its audience patience as atmospheric dissonance gives way to melodic guitar and harmonized vocals that paint a glaringly relatable portrait of a man with “wounds to mend.” A deliciously contemplative downer, the track is as haunting as its namesake suggests. Soon after its end, the infectious tempo and throbbing beat of “Outburst” fills the silence, switching the mood of the album from the musings of a contemplative loner to the pulsating heart of an unabashed romantic.

 

The bluesy growl of “One of These Days” casts a spell on its own terms, making the most of initially sparse but precise instrumentation, before blooming into an audible homage to the genre’s predecessors as well as its current greats. Furthered by “Acute Mountain Sickness Blues” and the addictive hook of “Honeytrap,” Them Jones prove that their metaphors are as memorable as their ability to shred. As the album progresses, the dreamy melody of “My Heroine Pretends” suitably precedes the delectable swagger of “Well Enough Alone,” which serves as the perfect prelude for the introspective depth of “Jennifer, My Plastic Girl” and “The Shrinking Violet Light,” which resurrects the candidness of Jay Reatard and the poetic genius of The White Stripes pre-De Stijil.

 

Ending with the delectably menacing “Now I Become Death” and trippy glory of “These Canyons,” A Mountain of Nonsense should be considered quintessential for any music lover. Them Jones’ official debut LP is well-deserving of heavy rotation and adoration. - Dianca London


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Exclusive Austin Deli Premiere: Blood Pumps release 'Long Gossip' off new EP

Blood Pumps comfortably blends smart song craft with interesting, accessible angularity; subtle counter points rhythmically and melodically with intelligent, almost-too-smart-for-pop lyricism delivered with Bill Stevenson's elastic tenor. The marriage of Black Joe Lewis' gut bucket guitar with Mike Brinley's dry-cleaned guitar stands in direct contrast to the washed out reverb and effects heavy sound of many contemporaries in the rock'n'roll scene. All of these ingredients and brush strokes are tied together by an analog beat machine that Stevenson used to record material in between tours of his normal gig backing up Joe.

The five songs on Blood Pump's EP display the prowess of three individuals applying themselves outside their comfort zone. Their new release,"Long Gossip", comes out in a stratling cacophany then cracks into a mid-tempo 3/4 groove then slyly resets int a 4/4 groove right as the guitar's quick-cat-lash vertical intro lines delve into Ric Ocasek territory.

-Lee Ackerley 

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The Two Lips serve up garage rock vibes on latest single "Repeat"

What if you spun your dial to the left and accidentally picked up a radio transmission from Mars? I'd like to think it'd sound something like The Two Lip's latest release "Repeat," a blitzed out garage rock track whose screeching opening sounds like it was snatched from a 1950's outer-space B-movie. Despite the extraterrestrial leanings, the Austin-based three piece's music is definitely of this earth--grounded primarily by heavy, fuzzy guitar riffs that cut the listener down with a visceral force. Though the track deals in garage hooks, the band blends in strong psych rock elements keeping things weird and oddly compelling. If music for funky martians is maybe your thing, check out "Repeat" streaming below.-Olivia Sisinni 

 

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The Novella unveils Sci Fi video for 'Heavy Balloon' + announces new album

This super fun video by The Novella for single "Heavy Balloon" caught our attention today. Somewhat disavowing their own name, the Austin based pop quartet looks for visual inspiration in the cheesy Sci Fi movies of the '70s. The song strikes a perfect balance between catchiness and sophistication, in a vein not too dissimilar from Camera Obscura's most memorable singles. The song will be included in their upcoming album House of Souls out 9/23.


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