x
Artist of the Month
the_deli_magazine

 
deli cover

 

 

February 2016
Jo Kusy
"You Break Me
"
mp3
Jo Kusy (Far-Out Fangtooth, The Whips) cultivates an eclectic, lo-fi daydream on his new full-length album, You Break Me. The record is currently available for purchase/download, and will be found on limited cassette on February 12 via Kusy’s own imprint Kooze Kontrol.
 
The album’s opener “Long Gone Angel” establishes the LP’s loose-moving atmosphere, as guitar trickles into a percussive/bass-oriented roll. The instrumentation briefly drops out, giving way to an a cappella moment and then a sax solo, before falling back into form. The bass-forward nature of “Only a Night,” coupled with its synth, thrusts one into a danceable framework. Background vocals soften the lead. In the insta-funky “All Go To Heaven,” Kusy proclaims, “Get down, hear the sound, boogie-woogie shake your claim…”
 
“Before You Opened Your Mouth” shifts into a light youthful disposition, reflected in its humorous lyrics - “Old people acting young, it’s ok cause its only fun/young people acting old, they sound stupid…” “Ghost Funk Lesson” drops into a sly island vibration - reminiscent of The Police, while “1st Place (But They Told Me 5th) develops a eerie tone with its heavy-footed thump and the mysterious whisper of the vocals. “All the creeps come out from the woodwork, as the sun begins to rise.”
 
With its sinister stir, “New Devil Beat” perpetuates a throbbing pulse, and “Cherry Pickin’ Baby” rides a thick bass-line to accentuate its heavier playful spin on rockabilly. Shedding some weight, “Silk Paradise” gently glides, paced by the clean snap of drums and unobtrusive guitar runs. Closing with its title-track “You Break Me,” the tail end of the LP rides a steady, floating wave; a heady trip punctuated by a stealthy stretch of guitar work, throwing some fire into the meditative calm.
 
You Break Me is a fun, unpretentious album that easily gets the head bobbing and toes tapping with its minimalist approach. It’s a sleeper that you definitely shouldn’t sleep on. - Michael Colavita

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

scene blog

boston

2015 Year End Polls For Emerging Artists: Results Scene by Scene


The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Boston's The Heavies play at Midway Cafe on Tuesday (2/16)

As their two releases, ‘Gorgeous’ and ‘Victor,’ from this past January make vividly clear, Boston’s The Heavies intrigue in reflectively freewheeling country-rock. The drum-thudded third song from the former, “The Jailbreak Blues” (streaming below), for example, details a man’s escape from prison with the kind of gruff warmth that Johnny Cash made his own. “Take Me Back” from the latter effort, a keys-backed song that is delightfully honky-tonk, similarly tells of longing for home but in such a way that is more raw than sappy, more real than fake, yet still allows for pure warmth. The Heavies play at Midway Café in Jamaica Plains, Massachussetts on Tuesday (2/16). – Zach Weg

|

Boston's Dan Masterson plays Middle East in Cambridge on Friday (2/12)

There is an earnestness in the power pop tracks of Boston-based piano man Dan Masterson that is deeply refreshing. As the flowing title track from his 2015-released third EP 'Atlas' shows, the smooth-voiced singer isn’t afraid to convey feelings of loss and restlessness in his music yet seems keen on championing a spirit of perseverance. The Billy Joel of such iconic tracks as "Piano Man" appears to be an influence on Masterson yet, as the alternative rock-tinged "Nobody I Know (Slow Down)" (streaming below) from the album shows, he impressively adds some edge to his celestial songs. Dan Masterson plays at Middle East in Cambridge, MA on Friday (2/12). - Zach Weg 

|

Studio Spotlight: Pablo San Martin

Most of the time, The Deli focuses on the immense talent of the performers in the New England region, but what about the people controlling the knobs and microphones, working hard to make sure the performers sound their best? I decided to turn the spotlight behind the mixing-board for once and shine a little light on a (currently) local engineer & producer, Pablo San Martin.

Born in London, growing-up in Chile, and studying sound engineering in France, Boston-based recording engineer and producer Pablo San Martin has been interested in recording music for over a decade. “I started playing drums with a metal band when I was 13 years old”, says San Martin.  “...I was that nerd in the band that thought the best thing to do was to do it on our own. I started recording my band and realizing that the world of recording and production was extremely varied and I enjoyed it more than playing drums. I've always liked heavy and deep sounds, that's when I started to get into electronic music.”

San Martin currently has a studio inside M-Works Mastering in Cambridge, where he does most of his work. He has helped a variety of artists on different projects both locally and through collaborations abroad. “I keep a close relationship with some of my clients from Europe”, says San Martin. “[T]hey actually do come to the USA to work with me--which is amazing!”

For more info on Pablo and his studio, visit his website.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)

|

|
|

aom
[sponsored by]
aps
 
Which of these acts was your favorite emerging Philly artist of 2015?
- news for musician and music pros -