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Artist of the Month
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July 2016
Spring Onion
"Please Relax
"
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Catherine Dwyer, also known as the guitarist for the alt-rock outfit Sports, offers fans the perfect soundtrack for summer feelings with the release of her solo EP Please Relax. Recorded under the moniker Spring Onion, her new album is DIY at its best. Mostly written and recorded within the walls of her Philadelphia home, Please Relax is an intimate portrait of yearning, infused with dream-pop nostalgia, heartfelt riffs, and candid poetics.

 

“Egg (Driving Song),” the EP’s opener, unfolds with an Aimee Mann-meets-Girlpool earnestness. Telling the story of a commute clouded by desire, the song is a catchy confessional, with lines like “I'm sorry for what I said and didn't say” and “I'll write songs about my flaws/cause that's a way to self absolve.” The lo-fi grit of Dwyer’s anthem instantly tugs at the heartstrings, transforming even the most jaded listener into a hopeful romantic with each iteration of its fuzzed-out beats.

 

That sentiment is extended on "Chili". Twangy chords are quickly followed by Dwyer’s straightforward but evocative vocals, bringing to mind Built To Spill’s “Carry the Zero” and B-sides by indie darlings like The Babies. The track, although laidback, is unflinchingly sincere, the steady build of its instrumentation, urging its audience to actively listen and exist in the moment. The hissing snare and piano of “Poem 3 (Piano)” cast a similar spell, making each reprise of “but I don’t live alone” a testament to the millennial plight of finding solace in a shared space, while the EP’s title track and atmospheric closer serves as a suitably melodic mantra to calm the anxieties and emotional side effects of living.

 

Despite its brevity, the openness of Please Relax is astonishingly raw and brave. Listening to her songs will remind you that you’re not alone. - Dianca London

 


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


People Like You ready release of sophomore album

Buzzwords like "fresh" and "innovative" get thrown around all the time in music journalism. They are pretty cool sounding afterall. Rarely, though, does an artist and their music justify the usage or embody the spirits of those words. Boston's People Like You do.  The indie outfit's debut LP from two years ago flew under our radar, but now's the perfect time to discuss it since they are working on its follow-up and playing a ton of live shows. At the core of their sound is the contrast between the band's cerebral instrumental arrangements and the visceral vocals.  Each of their songs is a swirling mix of instruments and styles from classical glockenspiels,  jazz horns and persussion to indie-rock guitars. The isnstrumental parts are intriguing, inventive and could probably function as post-rock songs just by themselves. That would, however, take away singer Chris Lee's emo and spoken-word styled vocals, and that would suck. Lee's at times laconic, others verbose, but always emotional vocals crash head-first into the band's instrumental arrangemtns to create a sound that excites emotions and provokes introspective thought. — Henry Solotaroff-Webber


Eternals release fresh LP, to play Lilypad Iman on 7/22

Folk may be an old, old genre, but that doesn't mean everyone has given up on trying to innovate it. Take the latest project by Somerville band, Eternals for example.  On Isn't That Any, the quartet intently root their music in the... rootiness of their lead singer's voice and snare-heavy percussion typical of folk, but on each track they also mix in a different genre or influence seamlessly, giving the album a broad musical width while still maintaining a strong investment in folk. One intriguing moment in the record is when they segue directly from "See You," a song drenched in shoegaze, to the alt-folk pop jam "Bar Room Dancing." At other times they even bring in some synth textures - perhaps signifying the emergence of "synth folk" as a genre? In short, it's always nice to see someone take the old traditional American music with open mind and heart, and Eternals have done just that on this latest LP.  You can check them out at Lilypad Inman on 7/22. —Henry Solotaroff-Webber


Sexy Coyote's chaotic, but somewhat under control 'Danger in the Deep' EP

While a core element of Sexy Coyote's unique brand of pop-punk is the cacophony they create by crashing arrangements into oneanother, it never feels like its a process that's being done haphazardly or ironically. Rather, on their recently released Danger in the Deep EP the band takes on the role of mad scientists, forging a sound that feels almost experimental at times but never without the precision or poise necesary to create a fundamentally tight sound. It's one that works on multiple levels as well: impassioned vocals, booming drums and quick tempos get the heart racing, while at the same time intriguing and often-shifting guitar patterns keep the mind intrigued.  Check out their new EP below. — Henry Solotaroff-Webber


A Deli New England premiere: Covey releases new single 'Bows'

Boston band Covey has been making some interesting noise as of late, releasing quality singles within the dream folk realm and opening for huge acts such as Hozier. Now potentially furthering this upward trajectory, they're premiering here "Bows," a track that may be most emblematic of their bourgeoning sound. Frontman Tom Freeman's expressive alto, partly reminiscent of The Tallest Man on Earth, takes both the roles of lead singer and backup vocalist through production magic. His passioned melodies are supported by a simple but well orchestrated guitar part and a reverberating high pitch drone, creating a spacious sound that evokes melancholy and emotional desolation. — Henry Solotaroff-Webber


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