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April 2014
Creepoid
"Creepoid
"
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The perfect solace for winter’s passing, Creepoid’s second full-length self-titled LP combines the zeitgeist of 90's grunge with pristine dissonance and somber lyricism. Released earlier this month by No Idea Records, Creepoid is eerie, melodic and stirring from beginning to end. 

The record’s introductory track “Nauda” opens with a singular note that swells into a melody, aligning itself with the listener in a way that feels confessional yet synonymous. A well-wrought continuation of the earnest diction reminiscent of Horse Heaven, “Nauda” is as bittersweet as its vocals, informed by the paradox of loneliness and longing. Expanding into a cinematically moody soundscape, guitars wail like sirens, beckoning chords to crash and settle into a fading ricochet - a premonition of “Sunday.” Coupled with acoustic strums and crisp vocal croons, a solemn request, “take my light and pull it out,” is beautifully melodic with perfectly placed tambourine that brings to mind the memorable mood concentrated. Exploring the affect and consequence of relational presence and its subsequent absence, the orchestration of “Sunday” renders a relatable narrative evocatively raw and sincere. 

“Yellow Wallpaper” ignites with driving bass and swirling riffs. As if resurrecting the perfection of Jeremy Enigk (ex-Sunny Day Real Estate), a la “Killed By An Angel” meets “Pillars,” the song evokes an eerie all consuming sense of the sublime that centers the track’s duration. Like an extension of Horse Heaven’s “Hollow Doubt,” the contextual weight of “Yellow Wallpaper” is harmonically haunting and intentionally poignant. “Baptism” washes over its listener in waves of riffs and echoed vocals that occupy an emotive territory similar to lesser-known tracks by Sonic Youth, subverted and painted darker by the brooding buzz reminiscent of shoegaze greats like My Bloody Valentine. 

In its decline, “Baptism” casts a feeling of transcendent submersion, befitting its namesake. With a crystallized aggression, “Gout” does the same - urgent and arresting with visceral shouts and screams. “Stay Inside” is considerably more subdued than the album’s preceding tracks but equally mesmerizing, unfolding “Tired Eyes,” a hypnotic chant of a fatigued psychedelic. “Golden String” feels slightly optimistic, while “Acrimony” blossoms then retracts into a reserved yet deliberate ballad that demands its audience’s attention like a gloomy lullaby with teeth. “Vulgar,” warm and sunlit, is lush and arresting, setting the stage for the album’s closer “Old Tree,” a jubilant ending to yet another epic compilation of clairvoyant anthems evoked by Creepoid. - Dianca Potts 


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Jeffertitti's Nile Sophomore Album 'The Electric Hour' due out April 29

Jeff "Jeffertitti" Ramuno may be best known for playing bass with Father John Misty, but he's doing just fine on his own. Of all the emerging psych rock bands in LA, and there are plenty, the crown belongs to Jeffertitti's Nile. They are in great company, but with their upcoming sophomore release, 'The Electric Hour,' they have (for now) solidified themselves as leaders of the pack. The energy of the cosmos, like the intangible ether inside a crystal ball traveling the edges of space-time, is packed into every nanosecond of every song. The deeper down the rabbit hole you go with these cosmic warriors, the further from reality you get, and the closer to a mystic truth steeped inside a universe with infinite dimensions. Jeffertitti's Nile are making music like its a movement. Stream lead single, "No One," and get lost in their sonic web. 'The Electric Hour' is due out April 29 on Beyond Beyond Is Beyond. - Jacqueline Caruso

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Dot Hacker to Release Limited Edition 7" For Record Store Day April 19

Mixing alt-rock with art-rock, Dot Hacker's music feels like the force of a tidal wave made purely of sound. The four-piece, formed by Red Hot Chili Peppers touring member, Josh Klinghoffer, and rounded out by road-worn touring musicians, Clint Walsh, Eric Gardner, and Jonathan Hischke, have planned a special 7" for Record Store Day on ORG Music. Two songs will make up this limited edition release, featuring the lead single, "Whatever You Want." Front and center are Klinghoffer's powerful vocals, grabbing you by the collar in the first 6 seconds and soaring like a fighter jet until the screaming end. At its heart, the tune is a hard hitting rock anthem, but the layers and layers of meticulous soundscapes at every transition are what make it well worth the repeat listens - (pay close attention to that tremolo effect on the bass). The 7" will be available April 19 with a sophomore full length expected later this year. - Jacqueline Caruso

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Video: Tapioca & the Flea "Take It Slow"

Tapioca & the Flea are an electro-pop quartet that meshes chromatic synths into their bracing, hand-waving choruses. They've just released a video for the track "Take It Slow", which features the band performing in the midst of a bitter quarrel between a couple, as it reminds us of their most brutal and compassionate moments through abrupt juxtaposed images. The track, which was produced by Crystal Castles' Ethan Kath, will appear on one side of a limited edition split 7" that will be available on Record Store Day. And speaking of which, catch their in-store set at Amoeba Music this Saturday at 6 pm.

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Mike Sempert plays Hotel Cafe on 4.16

Mike Sempert is better known as the songwriter and frontman of Birds & Batteries, a Bay Area duo that fused slinky electro-pop with proggy, seventies soft rock. So it doesn't come as much of a surprise that Serpent has scaled down the electronic contours of that project to follow a more natural sound. In the months leading to his move from the Bay Area to Los Angeles Sempert wrote the entirety of his debut full-length Mid Dream, an introspective reflection of that transitional period. It offers a faithful portrait of a hopeful transplant determined to make his move with the drifting, shimmering sounds of Americana at his side. Sempert will be playing a couple of shows in the West Coast, starting with an appearance at Hotel Cafe on April 16. 

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Artist to Watch: Girlpool

Acoustic punk duo, Girlpool, write unapologetically gut-punching songs with razor-sharp harmonies. Their debut release, the 7 song self-titled album recently released on cassette, has more depth than most over-produced rock albums that are sent straight to commercial radio. Each song clocks in at under 3 minutes, defining "leave them wanting more." Despite their lo-fi approach and punk aesthetic, the recordings are crystal clear, but still full of grit; creating punchy rhythms and plenty of groove without the use of drums. An impressive feat, these two are not to be ignored. And without sounding trite, it's impossible not to recognize the eery resemblance to an unplugged Nirvana. Standout tracks, "Paint Me Colors, and "Slutmouth," prove there is a new generation of feminists. Pulling together pieces of 80s and 90s female punk/Riot-grrrl trailblazers, Girlpool is rightfully claiming them as their own, and joining their voices to create a collective mouthpiece for gender-redefining millennials. Stream the entire album on bandcamp below and see them live tonight at The Bootleg, or April 12 at The Smell. - Jacqueline Caruso

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Stream: Banta "Dark Charms"

It's still a mystery why baby boomer soft rock has become such a commodity with the younger crowd these days, but such are the effects of living in an age of pop culture that commemorates its own past. The fine-tuned midtempo singles of Echo Park troupe Banta sound like they could've followed a Steve Winwood number in the radio twenty years ago, but nevertheless, there's a good reason why they'd even be featured at all. "Dark Charms", for instance, has a stiff groove that instantly grabs you with its minimalist groove, carried by a luscious production that features the seductive vocal delivery of Sharaya Mikael. This isn't necessarily the first incarnation of Banta's sound, as their previous release through Bandcamp, "3 Feet From Gold", has more of a neo-soul feel, but the steady, bourgeois tempo of "Charms" suits them very well. Banta are hosting a residency at Silverlake Lounge throughout the month of April.

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Stream: Emma Ruth Rundle, "Arms I Know So Well"

Standing well on her own two feet, Emma Ruth Rundle has released the first single from her forthcoming solo album, due out May 20 on Sargent House. She is best known for her work in Red Sparowes and Marriages, but this first listen feels like a necessary endeavor. The opening is wistful and ghostly, as her voice and guitar stand solitarily in reverberant space. The sparse arrangement pierces straight to the heart and leaves no room for doubt that her melancholy cries for comfort and redemption are an exorcism of sorts. Gently in the background, the strings moan like a tortured soul calling from the grave for deliverance. Her beautifully tortured cry of "please deliver me from all the evil I've done to myself and deliver me to arms I know so well" acts as a prologue to the story that is to unfold through the rest of her album. If these goosebumps are telling, it is sure to be amongst the top in those year end lists. - Jacqueline Caruso

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