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Artist of the Month
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March 2015
Blood Sound
"Nightclub
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Blood Sound’s post-punk tracks are informed by an audible nostalgia for the dance floors and goth clubs of the latter ‘80s. Their latest LP Nightclub is a hybrid of dark wave and dream pop. Marrying synth-drenched harmonies with emotively vibrant lyricism, the subtle romantics of the band’s debut full-length fit seamlessly with the buzzing percussive backbeats of earlier cuts by Cold Cave (circa Love Comes Close) or The Cure’s “Primary” stripped bare to its core.
 
“TV Synth 1” sets the tone for Nightclub’s narrative with a brief yet textured prelude to “I Don’t Want.” Relatable like an antithesis of The Smiths’ “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out,” Blood Sound’s “I Don’t Want” personifies the complexities of yearning, desire, and loneliness. As frontman Chris Jordan croons “I don’t want the city’s lights to go down/I don’t want to find home,” guitar riffs magnify the weight of his words without casting them melodramatic. The track is a fitting anthem for the passing of youth, failed love, and transition.
 
The buzzing start of “L.A. Punk” explores that thin line between authenticity and commoditization, the song’s instrumentation paying homage in its own way to the early underground and its subsequent subcultures. As if channeling a sedated rendition of Peter Murphy’s tone and diction, “L.A. Punk” is as memorable as it is brooding. “Acid Summer” gives an inward glimpse at the intimate nature of grief, mortality, and memory. When Jordan sings, “The 1980s died that day,” the listener feels it in their gut. It’s undeniable. The connection between what is experienced and how that experience is remembered is amplified by the track’s thumping tempo.
 
“Empty” plays out like the perfect soundtrack to an inevitable breakup, coupling affection with exhaustion, with the synth framing the heart-wrenching truth of lines like “I was too in love to say/that your story was a bore/Now I gave up on bad dreams and endings/beginnings and beginnings.” It offers a viable catharsis for jilted lovers with a penchant for fuzzed-out refrains.
 
“TV Synth 2” precedes the lyrically minimal yet heavy “Embrace” which serves as Nightclub’s melodic memento mori. “Almost” is subdued yet gripping, slowing the momentum of the record in advanced of “TV Synth 3,” which unfolds like a VHS fever dream. “Fake Blood” is evocative, with reverb and a pulsating backbeat that swells as the song progresses. Arguably the darkest track on the album, Jordan’s diction is hypnotic, “Kill your dreams and wait for/the fake blood to pour out.”
 
Ending with the well-placed “Catacombs,” Nightclub’s final track encapsulates the thrill of beginnings and the way one remembers them. Set to a beat reminiscent of Joy Division’s quintessential single “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Catacombs,” much like the songs that precede it, is reason alone to return to Nightclub. - Dianca London Potts

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Letters to Toska Reflects Zoya's Rich Musical Background

Letters to Toska, the fourth EP from Zoya, could easily be classified as “indie-folk” or “singer-songwriter”, but none of those labels would even come close to describing what takes place on these tracks. This EP reflects a perfect blend of jazz, folk and R&B, while still finding room to inject some hints of Zoya’s South Asian heritage. These influences are prominently displayed on the track “Willows”, with its smooth guitar-work and hip-hop/soul-inspired melodies and cadences. With such a dynamic mix of inspirations, I expect Zoya’s songwriting will only continue to become more intricate and mesmerizing as she continues her musical career.

For more information about Zoya, click here.


-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)
Photo Credit: Jerome Vivino


 

 

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Album Review: Krill--A Distant Fist Unclenching

A Distant Fist Unclenching, the newest batch of songs from Boston’s Krill, is--for lack of a more refined, technical musical term--freakin' awesome. Heavy Modest Mouse and Built to Spill influences permeate the tracks, especially on songs like “Foot.” Super-tight stops and thick guitars are rampant throughout this song (and the rest of the album), making it nearly impossible not to crank this record as loud as your speakers will go. 

Krill has quite a big year planned so far. Currently on a European tour, the band will be back in Boston on 3/13 for an LP release show at Great Scott, before heading back on the road for a string of dates that will be capped-off by an opening spot at this May's Boston Calling festival.  

For more about Krill (and to check out their upcoming tour dates), click here.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)

 

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TONIGHT: Dominic Florio, K.O., Kevin William and Jen Aldana at O'Brien's

Looking for a reprieve from the arctic cold? Look no further than O'Brien's in Allston tonight for a lineup loaded with catchy pop tunes from some incredible local acts. Dominic Florio, K.O., Kevin William and Jen Aldana will be livening-up the dive bar, presented by Boston Music Scene. Doors are at 8PM, $8, 18+. Just remember the number eight and you should be fine.
 

For more info about the show, click here.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)

 


The Sun Parade's Heart's Out EP

The Sun Parade’s Hearts Out EP feels like a care-free walk through the woods of Western Mass. The light hearted single “Hearts Out” showcases the vocal prowess of lead singer Chris Jennings, with a smooth and bright tone and surprisingly rich falsetto. They’re in the midst of tour right now and will be playing Great Scott in Allston, along with the ladies of And The Kids, this Wednesday February 25th, and again in New Haven, CT on the 26th. So Eastern MA and South Eastern CT, be sure not to miss these killer showcases what’s coming out of the Amherst area. You can download the EP here.

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