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August 2014
A Sunny Day in Glasgow
"Sea When Absent
"
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Sea When Absent (Lefse Records) opens like a shoegaze-y car crash. The latest album from A Sunny Day in Glasgow doesn’t bother gradually layering melodic elements; they get right to business from millisecond one, hitting you with reverberating electronic tones, orchestral violins, and the crooning vocals of Jen Goma and Annie Fredrickson. It’s a weirdly aggressive move for such an intensely soulful LP, but it’s pretty emblematic of how the record works as a whole. For an album as focused at creating moments of subtle beauty, Sea When Absent doesn’t have the time to let you gradually pick up on it on your own. A Sunny Day in Glasgow is the rare type of band that takes beauty and emotional resonances and waves it around like a chair in a bar fight.
 
In the strictest possible sense, this is a shoegaze-psychedelic-electronica album with a particular emphasis on vocals. But the more you listen; the more you start to discover what a diverse series of musical influences are rattling around in there. Mixing the electronica stylings of Flying Lotus and Saltillo with the indie-pop elements of bands like Death Cab and Phantogram, the basis is a percussion of grungy electronic tones, topped with a combination of guitar and synth, adding just the right balance, while being mixed in with a cavalcade of classical instruments and outlandish effects.
 
But the crown jewel of the album is Goma and Fredrickson’s understatedly gorgeous vocals. They play off, sometimes bizarre, instrumentations perfectly, complimenting them while also adding a fulcrum of relative normalcy to Sunny Day’s outside-the-box compositions. This is what really gives the album its sense of slick melancholy, creating an ambience of stylish vulnerability in tracks like “Byebye Big Ocean (The End),” where there is a sense of crooning sorrow, while “Oh I’m A Wrecker” sees them go much farther into the indie-pop paradigm.
 
While this record maintains the complexity and delightful weirdness of past A Sunny Day in Glasgow albums, it also comes with a newfound sense of clarity, in great part due to the outside production of Jeff Zeigler (of The War on Drugs and Kurt Vile fame). Zeigler is able to successfully piece together the moving parts of this bi-continental band, with mastermind Ben Daniels orchestrating things from the other side of the world in Australia, making the album’s abrupt left turns from spacey psychedelics to grounded punk-pop a little easier to digest. The wealth of ideas rarely feels busy or forced. Sea When Absent is ultimately proof that weird doesn’t necessarily have to mean messy. 

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


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Running the CMJ Marathon 2012 - Day 1 - by Josh S. Johnson
Blonds, Laura Stevenson, The Nightmare River Band, Sean0Sean, sami.the.great, Brainstorm, Everest Cale



The second best part of CMJ, after of course the opportunity to see tons of great bands for five straight nights in the greatest city for music, is the process of sorting through the seemingly endless list of bands in order to meticulously plan your personal schedule down to the minute. That feeling of invincibility concerning the laws of time and space is an awful like the one you get when you develop grand plans to start exercising and working out.  That brief sensation of euphoria lasts right up to the minute you told yourself you were going to start. Then you realize you already walked something like three flights of stairs that day, so really there’s no need to exercise.

Similarly, that confidence in a CMJ strategy lasts for the all too brief period between the schedule’s release and when the first band you see doesn’t start or finish on time. Suddenly those hours of planning turn are for naught as you blindly choose a venue to visit next. Yet the chaos of CMJ is part of its undeniable charm. As my uncle once said to me while my dad tried to figure out how he forgot to turn the lights off in the now-non-starting rental car we were driving through the middle of Alabama: “It’s part of the adventure.”

My CMJ adventure started with an example of the aforementioned scheduling hassles. I arrived at The Rock Shop around 7:30 with the intention of catching Brooklyn’s Howth, who released a solid indie-rock album, “Newkirk” earlier this year, at 7:45.  However, I soon learned that the band that was supposed to play at 7, Sean0Sean, was just beginning their set. Not wanting to leave Brooklyn empty handed, I stuck around and declared Sean0Sean, led by Brooklyn-born Sean Kiely, my first band of CMJ 2012.

Not only did Sean0Sean’s Rock Shop gig break the band’s CMJ virginity, it was their first gig, period. Hearing that, I felt that there wasn’t a better way to begin my week of researching upcoming bands than with a band that has never played a show before. When I arrived, the band consisted of only a guitarist and a bassist, but I was optimistic since I love the Flight of the Conchords. Well, Sean0Sean weren’t quite as entertaining Bret and Jemaine (and Murray, present), but they did bring a sort of straight-out-of-the-garage charm. Eventually a drummer joined the duo, and the newly formed trio banged out some solid garage-rock tunes.

brainstormAfter a brief excursion in Brooklyn, I made my way back to the East Village, where I spent the remainder of the night. First up was Portland, Oregon trio BRAINSTORM at the Lit Lounge. BRAINSTORM was certainly fun to watch and listen to, mostly due to the drummer/singer’s energy and the guitarist’s oscillation between psych distortion and the fluttery cleanliness of indie-rock. Also, the guitarist frequently put his instrument aside to grab a tuba, so that was neat.

nightmare river

I then made a quick walk to the Bowery Electric, where I caught the last couple songs of pop artist Sami Akbari, aka sami.the.great. Sami’s performance of Cyndi Lauper-like pop songs was enjoyable to watch and listen to, but it wasn’t particularly my cup of tea. However, the next act up at the Electric, The Nightmare River Band (pictured), was right up my alley.

The Nightmare River Band is the most aptly named band I’ve seen so far at CMJ. Many of their songs possess that sort of romantic notion that if the boat is sinking, then fuck it and party while you still can, specifically “Last Goodbye.” Ironically, they opened with “Last Goodbye,” which, at least by looking at its title, would seem like the perfect closing song. Instead, the band closed with an inspired cover of “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” by the Proclaimers, which was somehow an even bouncier version than the original. The dueling guitar and bass solos certainly helped. Overall, the Nightmare River Band a great set filled with some rather awesome rock n’ roll songs.

Returning to my home turf, I set up shop at the Delancey to see Blonds (top of page picture) perform at the Deli's Rootsy showcase. I had high expectations for the duo, who performed as a five-piece live, and they were undoubtedly exceeded. Singer Cari Rae began the show with her smoky, sultry vocals. Just as you start to view Rae as an angel from heaven, the instrumentation, led by guitarist Jordy Asher, knocks you off the side of the earth down into hell. Rae’s smile turns to a snarl, and her swagger rises as the controlled chaos builds around her. Every song took on new power live. While the studio version of “Mr. E” embodies the suaveness of James Bond, then the live take sounds like what happens when you replace 007’s martini with an assault rifle. With their commanding take of an already strong catalog, Blonds proved to be the highlight of CMJ Tuesday.

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After a misguided attempt to squeeze in seeing a band at Fontanas, I returned to the Delancy just in time for the tail end of Laura Stevenson & the Cans. Stevenson commanded the packed room with her confident folk-rock.

brainstorm

After Laura, I ended my first night of CMJ 2012 with Everest Cale The strength of Everest Cale’s debut EP, “Beast,” comes from Brett Treacy’s fantastic voice, which, at times, sounds like the late, great Layne Staley. While Treacy did howl like the eponymous beast, the star of the band’s performance at the Delancey was guitarist Jeremy Kolmin. Kolmin would rip off blistering solos while bending notes to new heights. With Treacy’s vocals and Kolmin’s guitar, Everest Cale delivered a high-quality performance. Plus, they won the coveted “Best Line of Stage Banter Award” with this gem: “You drunk assholes go fuck yourselves” (said jokingly, of course).

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

The Deli's CMJ Shows 2012

 

 
 
 

 

SUBMIT: THE DELI'S BEST OF NYC 2011 YEAR END POLL

Deli readers in bands,

Every year, The Deli's Year End Polls highlight hundreds of the best emerging artists in the 11 local US scenes we cover - and reward them with prizes from our sponsors.

As you may know, the winner of the NYC poll will grace the cover of the spring issue of The Deli.


Now established artists like Local Natives, Yeasayer, Twin Shadow, Vampire Weekends, Vivian Girls, Ra Ra Riot, Girls, Kurt Vile, Baths, Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Blank Dogs, Buke and Gass and many others won or did well in our polls months if not years before getting international recognition.

The end of the 2011 is quickly approaching and we are ready to go through the painstaking 2 month process involved in selecting the artists and processing the various votes. We are already asking our local jurors (mostly venue promoters, bloggers, record store and radio personnel) to cast their vote for their favorite local emerging artists. But of course, our polls are open to all bands who want to be considered: free submissions are open from now until December 4th HERE - after that date we'll have $5 submissions through SonicBids for another couple of weeks. All these submissions will be grouped by genre and filtered by The Deli's local editors and some Deli writers.

To submit for consideration and for more info about our year end polls please go
HERE.

Good Luck
The Deli's Staff

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Deli CMJ ELECTRONIC STAGE - TONIGHT, The Delancey - FREE!

At The Delancey on Tuesday 10.18 we'll have a truly fantastic bill with 9 NYC based electro-pop bands - and it's going to be free!. 21+ - $8.
Full listings of the Deli's CMJ shows here. See below for the Dream Pop and Alt Rock stages that same night in the same venue (downstairs).

P.S. If you are into Pedal Effects, don't miss The Deli's STOMP BOX EXHIBIT at CMJ on Friday and Saturday!!!

ELECTRO STAGE

7.00 - The Casualty Process



7.40 - Illuminator
8.20 - Tiny Victor ies
9.00 - Mitten
9.40 - Computer Magic


10.20 - Psychobuildings



11.00 - Pretty Good Dance Moves


11.40 - Caged Animals


12.20 - Slam Donahue

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Buzz Alert! Sunflower Bean plays every couple of days: Baby's All Right tomorrow (08.30)

Oh Sunflower Bean, you pretty little rock and rollers, you... What are we gunna do with you?  You're all so fashionable, so fresh and so clean, but your music brings as much color as your look (thank god) - and also some sweat and dirt.  I've attended a good handful of Sunflower Bean shows, and I have to say I'm very glad they released this track out of the bunch in their repertoire.  'Tame Impala' is undoubtedly their favorite band, so much they named a song after them.  "You always say what's on my mind," shreaks Julia Cumming; well Tame Impala is on Sunflower Bean's mind.  The tune contains one of my all time favorite Sunflower Bean breakdowns; about three minutes in, the song slows down and the bass booster on Nick Kivlen's pedal board makes his guitar sound like a synth until the song rides into a wave of psychedelic chaos of noise.  As of late the band has been hitting NYC venues once a week, often selling out places - check em out tonight (08.03) at Baby's All Right and on 09.03 at Bowery Electric. - Jake Saunders

We added this song to The Deli's playlist of Best Psych Rock songs by emerging NYC artists - check it out!

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Soulful electro pop act Ayer releases 'Fight Your Fire' + plays Mercury on 9.10

Just last week, Brooklyn-based electro-soul one man band AYER released his latest single “Fight Your Fire” (streaming) a midtempo track laced with Danny Schmittler’s smooth alto (borderline male soprano actually!). Schmittler has teamed up with a various producers to craft a series of undeniably catchy soul-pop tunes pushed along by swift-moving synths and a steady beat reminiscent of the 70’s disco tracks we all know and love. While the AYER project may still be in its infancy, it's already grabbing a lot of attention, and should maintain its momentum with a debut EP release scheduled for the winter. Be sure to catch the pair at Mercury Lounge on September 10th — the man has a great live energy and positive vibes all around. - Jillian Dooley

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Tiger Dare's inescapable calm

There's something strangely hypnotic about Tiger Dare's sound. It's floating on water, where every song feels like a breath of fresh air - and God knows we need some fresh air in this city.  Their songs feel good for the soul, often building towards wonderfully uplifting crescendos without losing the mellow.  Lost in a sea of reverb, lead vocalist Henry Freedland captures a personal nostalgia with "Morning After Morning" (streaming):  "When he's lonely he's so hopeless/When he's hopeless he's so boring/When he's boring it's just morning after morning".  The songs take the form of soundscapes, and under the distance there is a calm nostalgia to it all. The Brooklyn band's debut EP 'Wires Over, Wired In' has been gathering a fair amount of attention, and CMJ just announced them in the official lineup of the upcoming Music Marathon. - Jake Saunders

We added this song to The Deli's playlist of Best mellow songs by emerging NYC artists - check it out!

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Dead Leaf Echo keeps touring + appears on The B-Sides NYC Sessions tonight

Keeping up what can only be described as an impressively relentless touring schedule, Brooklyn’s Dead Leaf Echo are taking a break of sorts to appear on television. You can catch the Premiere of Episode 4 of The B-Sides NYC Sessions featuring the Brooklyn dream pop quartet today (8/28) on NYC Life and anytime after that online here.

Filmed at Littlefield in Brooklyn, the hit cable show features interview by Host Kristen Korvette. Additionally, select music videos are presented that reflect the common sound and vision of our scene. Dead Leaf Echo then will continue their rigorous touring schedule which takes them through Pennsylvania, New York, Boston, Ohio, Milwaukee and Chicago before heading to the west coast for more dates. Their latest EP "true.deep.sleeper" has been getting rave reviews and the band has now begun work on their second full length album. The current 10" EP which is available now on Moon Sounds Records benefits from the sonic touches of Monte Vallier (Weekend, Wax Idols,) and mastering engineer Joe Lambert (Deerhunter, School of Seven Bells). Fellow New Yorkers can catch them live at Pianos on 9/3. - Dave Cromwell

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