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New Releases from Punk Rock Payroll’s Dangerous Ponies and The Extraordinaires!

 

When covering up-and-coming indie artists, it can get a little confusing regarding an album’s “official” release date. While Dangerous Ponies already had a release party for their latest self-titled full-length in October at Philly AIDS Thrift, we recently received a press release from their new PR peeps (Team Clermont) about the “official” release of their LP happening today. They’ll be embarking on a massive two-month U.S. Spring Tour in support of the album. It also looks like fellow Puck Rock Payroll labelmates The Extraordinaires finally have some new material available. Well, according to their booking agent Monika Julien, there wasn’t really an official release date for their new EP The Post Card, except talks about them celebrating on bassist Matt Gibson’s birthday (March 11). But according to Team Clermont’s website, the EP’s “official” release date is actually also today. (The Extraordinaires are currently on tour in the south after roaming through the western part of the U.S. with a recent stop in Austin for a bunch of SXSW showcases.) Go out and grab both Punk Rock Payroll releases! We also have tracks from their latest efforts for you to check out below. Enjoy! - The Deli Staff
 

I Only Wear My Favorite Clothes at Home by Dangerous Ponies


The Big Show by The Extraordinaires

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Some Pics from VWVOFFKA Benefit

VWVOFFKA, a multi-functional store front facility in North Philly, opened their creaky doors to host a benefit show for renovations to their new space this past Saturday! And yes, barbecue, beer, and bands can happen somewhere besides Austin. (Below are pics of Party Photographers joining in on the festivities for the evening.)
 
"We all live here, and the money raised tonight is going to clean up the store front. We have music, art and spoken word events often, and I guess what makes us different from every other collective is the fact that the work we host is not just for other artists, but for everyone; we really feel like art should be interactive and involve the community." - Masha Badinter, VWVOFFKA Co-founder)
 
(Words and Photos by Emma Branson)
 

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Dave P & Sammy Slice Open for Simian Mobile Disco & Blondes at The Troc March 22

Dave P is back from SXSW after bringing the futuristic sounds of Making Time to Austin. While Texas might have proved a little too hot for his cardigan sweaters, I’m guessing that he will be quite comfortable tonight at The Troc with buddy Sammy Slice at his side when they open for London’s Simian Mobile Disco and Brooklyn’s Blondes. You should already be quite familiar with Simian Mobile Disco. The Making Time favorites are no strangers to Philly, especially after hosting the big LCD Soundsystem after-party at The Ox, so there should be plenty of familiar faces gettin’ down and showin’ off their best dance moves this evening. Get ready to lose yourself in waves of sonic bliss! The Trocadero, 1003 Arch St., 8pm, $14 adv/$17 door, All Ages - H.M. Kauffman
 
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FYI on DIYs in PHL: Y-Not Radio’s Josh T. Landow

Josh T. Landow has been on the wrong side of a couple bad break-ups recently. Starting with the fall of Y100 and culminating with the firing of the YRock staff from WXPN in July of 2010, Josh has stood his ground. Out of this grew the “I’m with Josh T.” campaign that supported Landow and his, at the time, new internet radio station Y-Not Radio that became the new home of many DJs and volunteers who stuck with Josh since the Y100 days. While interviewing Josh it became apparent that the issue, for him, is not about picking sides though, it is about working towards the greater good of media distribution. It is about creating and sustaining a strong following while remaining independent. It is about music. Josh T. Landow has been interested in being true to himself and his vast musical taste since the start, and he finally is the one calling the shots with Y-Not becoming a prominent station in Philly and beyond. Landow and crew are gearing up for their 16th Modern Rock Madness where they play off the NCAA tournament with musical matchups of their own. Make sure to take part in it which starts today, and read Josh’s thoughts on the rise of blogs and the internet, the challenges and triumphs of starting a radio station, and the ever popular studio cats HERE.
 
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FYI on DIYs in PHL: Y-Not Radio's Josh T. Landow

- by Adam G.

Josh T. Landow has been on the wrong side of a couple bad break-ups recently. Starting with the fall of Y100 and culminating with the firing of the YRock staff from WXPN in July of 2010, Josh has stood his ground. Out of this grew the “I’m with Josh T.” campaign that supported Landow and his, at the time, new internet radio station Y-Not Radio that became the new home of many DJs and volunteers who stuck with Josh since the Y100 days. While interviewing Josh it became apparent that the issue, for him, is not about picking sides though, it is about working towards the greater good of media distribution. It is about creating and sustaining a strong following while remaining independent. It is about music. Josh T. Landow has been interested in being true to himself and his vast musical taste since the start, and he finally is the one calling the shots with Y-Not becoming a prominent station in Philly and beyond. Landow and crew are gearing up for their 16th Modern Rock Madness where they play off the NCAA tournament with musical matchups of their own. Make sure to take part in it which starts today, and read Josh’s thoughts on the rise of blogs and the internet, the challenges and triumphs of starting a radio station, and the ever popular studio cats.

The Deli: How did your passion for radio begin?

Josh T. Landow: If you want to go all the way back, I seem to recall taping my own fake talk shows on cassette with stuffed animals as guests (whom I provided the voices for). This of course was when I was 22. But I guess my passion for real radio began without my realizing it when I was a teenager listening to Y100 when I was starting to drive. Shortly thereafter I discovered WDRE and that pretty much kicked Y100’s ass (at the time). But then WDRE announced that they were going off the air. Catch was they were given a 2 week period to basically blow up the station as they saw fit. As sad as it was, listening to all the jocks facing their unemployment and talking about looking for jobs was the most compelling and “real” radio that I’d ever heard. I listened literally every moment that I wasn’t in class or asleep. I was going to art college at the time and passed by DRE’s studios every day on my way so I decided to just stop in and pay my respects a few days before they went off the air. I decided to make an impression by covering my clothes in cut out WDRE logos, and I actually got to go on the Sarah and Vinnie morning show. Getting that look at the inner workings of the radio station (seeing the legendary microphone held up by bumper stickers and the board that Sarah Clarke famously spilled orange juice into) made me want to be more than just a radio listener. Fortunately, I met a couple folks that day who helped me make that possible - Marilyn Russell and Bret Hamilton. Those 2 along with Preston Elliot and program director Jim McGuinn were quickly hired at Y100. I kept in touch and came on board as an intern that summer (1997). After that they could never get rid of me so eventually they just hired me.

TD: What are the positive and negative effects that the Internet has had on radio?

JTL: The positive effects have been that radio can be far more interactive by utilizing station websites, e-mail, instant messaging, and (in the last few years) social media networks to connect in different ways with listeners. To most people radio is a secondary medium. They listen when they’re in the car or maybe while they’re making dinner, or have it on in the background at work, etc… Someone may hear that there’s a certain program or an interview with their favorite band on at a time that they just won’t be listening, but the internet has made it possible for stations to archive their content for “on demand” listening, which I think is great. Of course, for someone like me who runs an internet only station, it’s certainly leveled the playing field to some degree. By spending a few thousand dollars, I can put out a product that is just as good or better than the FM stations in the market. Because I don’t have the huge overhead operating costs that they do, I don’t have to worry about making the huge sums of money that they do. That allows stations like Y-Not Radio to program to more musically adventurous audiences, whereas the FMs have to program to the masses. Add to that the growing availability of the internet wherever you are, whether it be on your phone, in your car. Soon enough an FM station will have no real advantage over internet-only stations.

Certainly there’s been a negative impact on radio from the internet as well. That same tech savvy musically adventurous audience has a million places to find their music online and most of it is free. Whether it’s blogs, bit torrents, Pandora, BandCamp, etc… The choices are limitless and totally customizable to individual taste. It’s easy for radio to get lost in the shuffle. But I like to look at that as an opportunity for radio to excel - to be tastemakers who curate a great collection of music and help people discover new things so they don’t have to do all the searching through the ethos themselves.

TD: What is radio’s place in the mp3-a-minute, blog-dominated climate of today’s new music scene? Do you see blogs as a replacement of radio of sorts?


JTL: Oops. I guess I covered that pretty much with my last answer. I will just go on to say that I hope blogs don’t ever replace radio. There’s a certain connection that a listener can have with radio where the radio personality becomes their buddy playing records and chatting about music and life with you. I think that’s harder to get from a blog, especially when most music bloggers are trying sooooo hard to impress you with their words. The writing never really seems natural. Granted there are plenty of radio hosts who don’t speak naturally and try way too hard to be clever. Just being yourself and not worrying so much about every word that you say or type goes a long way to making the one on one connection with people. Then you can have a conversation with someone rather than just talking at them.

TD: What has been the most challenging part of starting Y-Not Radio?

JTL: Starting Y-Not Radio has been a huge challenge in that I lost the backing of a larger institution. I’d gotten used to not only getting a paycheck, but to having a really nice facility to work in with professional recording studios and engineers, a marketing budget, people to deal with the business end of things (I HATE NUMBERS). Not only did I lose all that, but I had to start fresh to building an audience and getting the word out that “we’re over here now”.

TD: What has been the most rewarding thing?

JTL: There have been a lot of rewarding things about starting Y-Not Radio. First of all I’m very proud of myself that I didn’t simply accept the hand that I was dealt. It’s very empowering to be the little guy standing up for himself against a much bigger force. And even better than that is the support that I’ve gotten from so many people, some that I know and some who I don’t know. Obviously I wouldn’t be doing Y-Not Radio if it was just me playing records and talking to myself. The fact that 95% of my staff walked out and came with me to start this new venture and that so many listeners followed us is something that has absolutely blown my mind.

TD: What does the future hold for Y-Not? What exciting things are coming up?

JTL: I see Y-Not Radio continuing to grow in both scope and audience. With the spring and summer concert season approaching, expect to hear more and more bands performing live in our studios, including tons of local bands. As an aside, I think we’re covering the local music scene better and more prominently than ever. We play more local acts with much more frequency than before and each week we turn over our airwaves for an hour to a local band for the Y-Not Philly show where they get to take over the station with a live performance, interview, and their very own playlist of Philly artists that they love. We also have the continuation of the annual Modern Rock Madness tournament coming up the week of March 21st. That’s where we rip off all the excitement of the NCAA College Basketball Tournament, but have 64 bands facing off against each other single elimination style with listeners deciding their fates. I believe this will be the 16th annual Modern Rock Madness dating back to when it started at WDRE in 1995.

TD: What are doing to set your station apart from other Internet radio stations?


JTL: I think that keeping a local identity sets us apart from a lot of internet stations that don’t have as much of an identity. Y-Not Radio is a Philadelphia station. We’re proud of our city, and it’s great music scene! You’ll see us out there at The First Unitarian Church, The Troc, The Factory, The TLA, The North Star, etc… Also we have people on live all-day long whereas many internet stations are just a jukebox. We’re live and we’re local. That sets us apart. Also we have the best music taste of anyone anywhere ever.

TD: Given your involvement in radio through its highs and lows, what do you think the future of radio looks like?

JTL: I think that radio will always have its place, but just like the big record labels are falling, the big radio companies will hopefully lose their stranglehold on the industry. Maybe small stations like mine are the future. Either way, when a high school or college kid asks me what they need to do to get into the business, I tell them “Don’t.” As machines continue to replace human jobs, it’s getting harder and harder to find a job in radio. If it’s your passion so much that you start your own station like I did here, well let’s just say that the pay’s not so hot.

TD: Who is the best voice radio has ever had (besides your own, of course)?

JTL: Definitely not mine! Ever? I guess I’d have to go with Orson Welles. Also because he was Unicron.

TD: What are you favorite acts (local/national/international) right now?

JTL: As there is soooooo much music out there these days, I’m listening to more than ever and that makes this harder to answer. Some current Philly favorites are GANG, East Hundred, Free Energy, Early Ape, Cheers Elephant, Arc In Round, An American Chinese, Sun Airway, Steve Goldberg and The Arch Enemies. A couple who I just caught live for the first time who blew me away were Buried Beds and Dragon King. I’m probably leaving some out, and I don’t want anyone to get mad at me.

Nationally (and internationally) speaking my all-time favorite band is The Smashing Pumpkins (in their original incarnation). Nowadays my absolute favorites are probably Silversun Pickups and Muse. But in terms of emerging artists - Florence + The Machine, Two Door Cinema Club, Phantogram, and Delphic are some off the top of my head. This is seriously one of the hardest questions for a music lover to answer. It’s like who’s your favorite child.

TD: What is your favorite album of 2011 (so far, of course)?

JTL: The new albums from Cake, British Sea Power, and The Go! Team have definitely been in heavy rotation, but I am certain that my favorite album of 2011 has yet to be released.

TD: What is your favorite thing about Philadelphia?

JTL: There are so many things that I love about this city, but as my very favorite thing I will choose something that I’m certain no other city in the world can claim. We have a karaoke night hosted by a guy who dresses up like Skeletor!

TD: What is your least favorite thing about Philadelphia?

JTL: SEPTA?

TD: Can you tell us a bit about the Studio cats?

JTL: They’re the best cats ever! Hugo and Starla were found in dumpster as tiny kittens, and thankfully were rescued by PAWS. Through a series of fortunate events and coincidence they wound up finding their home in our top secret Bunker studio where they love hanging out with whatever rock stars swing by. Some of their favorites have been Melissa Auf Der Maur, Kate Nash, Two Door Cinema Club, and Free Energy. Unfortunately they do take a certain pleasure in disrupting our broadcast from time to time.

TD: What was your favorite FEZtival?

JTL: Honestly a lot of them blend together. I was usually so busy that I didn’t get to see the bands, but back in 1998 before I had too much responsibility, I got to go right up to the front of the pit for Ben Folds Five and that was amazing.

TD: What is your favorite thing to get at the Deli?

JTL: I’ll give props to Fu Wah Deli in my hood. Those tofu hoagies are amazing. I might just get one right now.

 

 

will

 
 
 

 

Modern Rock Madness 2011

 

 
 
 
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