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Artist of the Month
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September 2016
Them Jones
"A Mountain of Nonsense
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Philly rockers Them Jones craft far-out riffs and psych-drenched anthems, reviving and reinventing soundscapes reminiscent of the Age of Aquarius on their new LP A Mountain of Nonsense.

 

Beginning with the steady buzz of “Mended All Made Clean,” the five-piece's efforts make one take notice, as reverbed screams and gritty cymbals collide with satisfying repetition and impassioned diction. As if filling the narrative chasm between Mikal Cronin’s “Gone” and Ty Segall’s “Inside Your Heart,” Them Jones’ album opener sinks deep into the hearts of listeners without pretense or apology. “Hollow Man” captivates in a similar fashion by teaching its audience patience as atmospheric dissonance gives way to melodic guitar and harmonized vocals that paint a glaringly relatable portrait of a man with “wounds to mend.” A deliciously contemplative downer, the track is as haunting as its namesake suggests. Soon after its end, the infectious tempo and throbbing beat of “Outburst” fills the silence, switching the mood of the album from the musings of a contemplative loner to the pulsating heart of an unabashed romantic.

 

The bluesy growl of “One of These Days” casts a spell on its own terms, making the most of initially sparse but precise instrumentation, before blooming into an audible homage to the genre’s predecessors as well as its current greats. Furthered by “Acute Mountain Sickness Blues” and the addictive hook of “Honeytrap,” Them Jones prove that their metaphors are as memorable as their ability to shred. As the album progresses, the dreamy melody of “My Heroine Pretends” suitably precedes the delectable swagger of “Well Enough Alone,” which serves as the perfect prelude for the introspective depth of “Jennifer, My Plastic Girl” and “The Shrinking Violet Light,” which resurrects the candidness of Jay Reatard and the poetic genius of The White Stripes pre-De Stijil.

 

Ending with the delectably menacing “Now I Become Death” and trippy glory of “These Canyons,” A Mountain of Nonsense should be considered quintessential for any music lover. Them Jones’ official debut LP is well-deserving of heavy rotation and adoration. - Dianca London


This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Deli Regional Year End Polls Update: Open Submissions Results slowly released

Deli readers, indie bands and artists,

This year, our Year End 2011 Polls for emerging artists are proving to be more challenging than ever, with 11 US scenes involved and 1,500+ submissions between our own system and the Sonic Bids applications. We are spending a significant portion of the our Holidays listening to your music (thanks for that by the way!), and we haven't even had the chance to check out the bands selected by our jury of local promoters, bloggers and scene makers yet...

ANYWAYYYY... the results of the Open Submissions are slowly coming toget and we are slowly going to publish them starting with NYC (check back!). Sonic Bids selections will be coming after that.

Whether you were selected or not, it's always good to remember that in 1961 The Beatles were rejected by Decca with the following gems: "guitar groups are on the way out" and "The Beatles have no future in show business." Take that as a friendly reminder that there is no final authority on music, despite what pitchfork.com would have you believe.

Year End Poll Next Phase: The Fans' Poll
The next phase of the Poll - a vote open to the fans - is likely to start in the first week of January and end at the end of that same month. We'll spread the cities out a little bit to minimize contemporary traffic spikes that repeatedly brought our site down last year. So stay tuned. We should have the final results for our two separate final charts (fans poll and composite chart including the jurors' vote) by the end of January.

Also, of course all this is possible also because of our sponsors - many of them are providing free studio time and prizes for the winners. Here they are - God Bless 'em!

LIST OF PRIZES FOR POLL WINNERS COMING SOON!

The Deli's Staff


Ratigan -- Fortune Metal

Within the first moments of Fortune Metal’s opening song, it’s obvious that Pavement is possibly the biggest influence on Ratigan’s music. The Providence, RI indie group, led by 20-year-old Patrick Higgins, share a nostalgia similar to that of most kids who grew up in the 1990s, and it is made evident in their lo-fi and low-key alternative rock. Higgins talk-sings his way through Cherry Blossom and the rest of the songs in a way that blends Gordon Gano, Stephen Malkmus, and John McCrea at its best, but sounds as if it was recorded in his sleep at its worst.

The fifteen songs of Fortune Metal range from the boisterous noise of Get a Load of THIS (Magic the Void) and the aptly named What the Fuck (Noise), to the instrumental explorations of Criteria, Dreaming of You, Waltz, and Love You. The band make it a point to add fits of clamor sporadically throughout.

One of the album’s highlights to play on repeat is French Kiss, a quirky and endearing song of seduction that you’ll wish someone wrote with you in mind. Higgins quips lines like “Unbutton my buttons and lay me down to die / Black mascara dripping from the circles in your eye”; The perfect make-out jam for the lusty indie pop couple.

Fortune Metal concludes its 42-minute journey with its most candid and gripping track, Chaos. Soft guitar and tambourine lead into introspective and emotionally hopeless lyrics. The song proceeds into ghostly wails echoing behind the repeated droning of “the emptiness always finds its way back in.”

The music Ratigan produces here is always understated and blissfully haphazard, but never dull. Unrefined and earnest, Fortune Metal proves to be an ambitious first full length for Ratigan.

--Sarah Ruggiero


Night Fruit -- Dark Horse 7"

A long time ago, the only wise thing a very unwise person said was “Revolutionize your field and, short of that, convince others that is what you’re doing”, This is a rough paraphrase, of course; however, the point is Night Fruit don’t need to convince too hard.

On Dark Horse, their follow up to their debut Triangles EP, they blend a shoegaze dreaminess with sinister post-apocalyptic undertones, due to the otherworldy-ness of lead singer Amanda Dellevigne’s voice. It is a voice that rises and falls dreamy and distant and rides Jonathan Gill’s guitar like a stripper on a pole -- all hips and swinging around. Commanding is one word to use. The guitar is reverby, and how. Jon often looks like he’s play-acting rockstar when he’s on stage, but it all comes down to the fact that he loves to entertain. He’s a greater guitar player for it too; this man isn’t afraid to throw every iota of emotion into a set or onto a record. Luke Sullivan’s tight drumming betrays his disaffected demeanor; he’s having fun no matter how taciturn the expression on his face.

The title track undulates out of the gate with dreamy riffing from Gill’s end and builds from there on out with Dellevigne’s voice, that enchanting dreamscape voice. Paper Thin is more of a straight forward rock song that includes some lovely building and breaking down, the bridge for this song was my favorite on the album. Bittersweet finishes this offering with some poppy goodness, a great bouncy beat, and some sing-a-long quality lyrics. Overall, a great showing from this excellent gang of bandits.

Night Fruit shows have a tendency to be an awfully good time and you should check them out. These smooth operators can be seen in the near future on:
Jan 10 at TT the Bear's with Slowdim and You Can Be A Wesley
Feb 24 at O’Briens with Lymbyc Systym

--Chris Saenz


Miss Geo -- The Story

Hailing from Rhode Island, indie-pop artist Miss Geo is ready to make a big impact on the New England music scene, and with an album like The Story, it’s hard not to be impressed. The album contains some of the best vocal tracks I’ve heard from a local artist in a long time. The project serves as a solo outlet for leading lady Abby Gutierrez.  Her voice is a wonderful combination of Tegan and Sara with a splash of Metric thrown in for good measure.

Gutierrez seems to have cracked the code for crafting perfect pop songs; her track Snake Soiree being a prime example of her talent. The long, slow build-up of the verse into a full-on synth-laden dance party chorus is brilliant. Once again, I found myself dancing in my chair as I typed this review.

Gutierrez’ talents extend far deeper than just instrumentation or orchestration of songs. Her lyrical descriptions are quite striking. Fore xample, in Snake Soiree she described her significant other as being “muter than the silent film stars”, an image that I found to be very powerful.

This collection of songs is well-worth a listen (or two, or three). I would not be surprised to hear her songs start showing up on the radio (they certainly have enough hooks and pop-clarity). If my ravings about Miss Geo haven’t yet convinced you of Gutierrez’ skills, head on over to the Miss Geo Myspace page or check Miss Geo out live (accompanied by her live band consisting of fellow musicians Jessy Bartlett, Chris Mendoza, and James Wilhelmsen).


ComScore

--Daniel McMahon


Prayers for Atheists on Hardcore and Politics

I met up with Alan Hague and Jared Paul of the Providence-based hardcore punk band Prayers for Atheists (PFA) for a Thai dinner on a warm, late-summer evening. The restaurant was about the size of my closet so when we sat at the tiny table we knocked knees at the tiny table and struggled not to distract the seven year-old girl and her family eating at the next table over.

Our hour-long conversation meandered from the history of hardcore punk to political activism to pop music. We started with their recent tour.

Click here to read the rest of the interview by George Dow.


Prayers for Atheists -- Guns Up


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