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Artist of the Month
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September 2016
Them Jones
"A Mountain of Nonsense
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Philly rockers Them Jones craft far-out riffs and psych-drenched anthems, reviving and reinventing soundscapes reminiscent of the Age of Aquarius on their new LP A Mountain of Nonsense.

 

Beginning with the steady buzz of “Mended All Made Clean,” the five-piece's efforts make one take notice, as reverbed screams and gritty cymbals collide with satisfying repetition and impassioned diction. As if filling the narrative chasm between Mikal Cronin’s “Gone” and Ty Segall’s “Inside Your Heart,” Them Jones’ album opener sinks deep into the hearts of listeners without pretense or apology. “Hollow Man” captivates in a similar fashion by teaching its audience patience as atmospheric dissonance gives way to melodic guitar and harmonized vocals that paint a glaringly relatable portrait of a man with “wounds to mend.” A deliciously contemplative downer, the track is as haunting as its namesake suggests. Soon after its end, the infectious tempo and throbbing beat of “Outburst” fills the silence, switching the mood of the album from the musings of a contemplative loner to the pulsating heart of an unabashed romantic.

 

The bluesy growl of “One of These Days” casts a spell on its own terms, making the most of initially sparse but precise instrumentation, before blooming into an audible homage to the genre’s predecessors as well as its current greats. Furthered by “Acute Mountain Sickness Blues” and the addictive hook of “Honeytrap,” Them Jones prove that their metaphors are as memorable as their ability to shred. As the album progresses, the dreamy melody of “My Heroine Pretends” suitably precedes the delectable swagger of “Well Enough Alone,” which serves as the perfect prelude for the introspective depth of “Jennifer, My Plastic Girl” and “The Shrinking Violet Light,” which resurrects the candidness of Jay Reatard and the poetic genius of The White Stripes pre-De Stijil.

 

Ending with the delectably menacing “Now I Become Death” and trippy glory of “These Canyons,” A Mountain of Nonsense should be considered quintessential for any music lover. Them Jones’ official debut LP is well-deserving of heavy rotation and adoration. - Dianca London


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


The Rare Occasions to release new EP 8/13, go on east coast tour

 As it's developed over the years, the garage-rock genre, and it's variations, has grown to include many types of music, and none know this better than Boston by-way-of Providence group The Rare Occasions. Instead of opting to section themselves off into one of the genre's many corners, the band instead embraces its multi-faceted nature wholeheartedly, and play tunes that fall anywhere on the spectrum between swampy pop all the way to harder, dischordant punk. Because of this it's hard to know what to expect off of their forth-coming EP Futureproof, due out August 13th, aside from it should be eclectically electric.  The Rare Occasions are going on an east coast tour in support of their new EP available on 8/5, indluding a release show at The Middle East on 8/13. —Henry Solotaroff-Webber


Arc Iris release new video for “Kaleidoscope” + plays Cafe` Nine on 07.21

The staggeringly beautiful stylings of Providence, RI group Arc Iris have been brought to life in their new video for “Kaleidoscope,” a single off of their upcoming album “Moon Salon.” The three piece ensemble, which includes former Low Anthem member Jocie Adams, uses tantalizing vocal melodies, mysterious cello lines, emotionally-charged drum beats, and lush harmonies to create mesmerizing performances, both acoustically and visually. The new video is no exception - it features a blended interaction of dancers, musicians, and light for a psychedelic display, reminiscent of Joanna Newsom, Fleetwood Mac, and Animal Collective. The video takes you on a fantastic journey through their sound, which is unique, compelling, and enchanting. You can catch Arc Iris’ enchanting aura this July at their C’mon Everybody residency in Brooklyn, starting on July 5, and in New Haven, CT on July 21. - Dan Rome


Way Out takes on Great Scott on 4.14

Do you ever miss your days of teen angst, where every slight was a deep wound that only music could heal? No? Well, listen to Way Out and you will just get it. There is something nostalgic and analog in Way Out’s music, the way Knox belts out the vocals, the deep reverb of the bass pulsing slowly in the background as the guitar speeds jaggedly through the track. It’s reminiscent of early 80’s post punk goth scene – a little bit of The Cure’s brooding atmosphere with a pinch of The Smiths’ despondence, perfect for your gloomy days. Or happy days. Or completely average days. Sometimes you just need a little dark and gloomy in your playlist amidst all the bubbling pop of today and Way Out has that for you. Catch them at Great Scott on April 14 and take a listen below!


Providence folk artist Ian Faria plays AS220 on 3/29

A little over a week ago, Providence folk musician Ian Faria released his unabashedly joyous latest album, ‘Animal Songs.’ Starting with the ambling “Raccoon Song,” halved by the elegant “Cassafrass Blues,” and including “Prayer Song” (streaming below), a ukulele-jumped track that features fellow Providence eccentric Edgar Clinks, the technically masterful fifteen-song effort (which follows Faria’s ‘Covers’ album from last year) exudes real-life gravitas while jubilantly soaking in summer joy. Ian Faria plays AS220 in Providnce, Rhode Island on 3/29. – Zach Weg 


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