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Artist of the Month
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March 2015
Blood Sound
"Nightclub
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Blood Sound’s post-punk tracks are informed by an audible nostalgia for the dance floors and goth clubs of the latter ‘80s. Their latest LP Nightclub is a hybrid of dark wave and dream pop. Marrying synth-drenched harmonies with emotively vibrant lyricism, the subtle romantics of the band’s debut full-length fit seamlessly with the buzzing percussive backbeats of earlier cuts by Cold Cave (circa Love Comes Close) or The Cure’s “Primary” stripped bare to its core.
 
“TV Synth 1” sets the tone for Nightclub’s narrative with a brief yet textured prelude to “I Don’t Want.” Relatable like an antithesis of The Smiths’ “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out,” Blood Sound’s “I Don’t Want” personifies the complexities of yearning, desire, and loneliness. As frontman Chris Jordan croons “I don’t want the city’s lights to go down/I don’t want to find home,” guitar riffs magnify the weight of his words without casting them melodramatic. The track is a fitting anthem for the passing of youth, failed love, and transition.
 
The buzzing start of “L.A. Punk” explores that thin line between authenticity and commoditization, the song’s instrumentation paying homage in its own way to the early underground and its subsequent subcultures. As if channeling a sedated rendition of Peter Murphy’s tone and diction, “L.A. Punk” is as memorable as it is brooding. “Acid Summer” gives an inward glimpse at the intimate nature of grief, mortality, and memory. When Jordan sings, “The 1980s died that day,” the listener feels it in their gut. It’s undeniable. The connection between what is experienced and how that experience is remembered is amplified by the track’s thumping tempo.
 
“Empty” plays out like the perfect soundtrack to an inevitable breakup, coupling affection with exhaustion, with the synth framing the heart-wrenching truth of lines like “I was too in love to say/that your story was a bore/Now I gave up on bad dreams and endings/beginnings and beginnings.” It offers a viable catharsis for jilted lovers with a penchant for fuzzed-out refrains.
 
“TV Synth 2” precedes the lyrically minimal yet heavy “Embrace” which serves as Nightclub’s melodic memento mori. “Almost” is subdued yet gripping, slowing the momentum of the record in advanced of “TV Synth 3,” which unfolds like a VHS fever dream. “Fake Blood” is evocative, with reverb and a pulsating backbeat that swells as the song progresses. Arguably the darkest track on the album, Jordan’s diction is hypnotic, “Kill your dreams and wait for/the fake blood to pour out.”
 
Ending with the well-placed “Catacombs,” Nightclub’s final track encapsulates the thrill of beginnings and the way one remembers them. Set to a beat reminiscent of Joy Division’s quintessential single “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Catacombs,” much like the songs that precede it, is reason alone to return to Nightclub. - Dianca London Potts

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


The Deli's SXSW 2015 Issue is out digitally!

Ladies and Gents,

The SXSW 2015 issue of The Deli can be now read online here. 10k copies of this baby will flood the streets of Austin during SXSW Music Week.

It will be a busy time for us as usual, with the madness of the Stompbox Exhibit in full swing, joined this year by a sister expo called Synth Space!

So yeah... if you are attracted to nerds, come and see us at the SXSW Music Gear Expo inside the Austin Convention Center from March 19 to March 21 (11am-6pm)!

We'll also have a small live showcase, here are the details:

THE DELI'S SXSW 2015 SHOWCASE

FACEBOOK EVENT
WHEN: Friday 03.20, 4pm
WHERE: FLatstock Stage (Austin Convention Center)

4.00 Prinze George (DC Area)
4.45 Lazyeyes (Brooklyn, NY)
5.30 Roger Sellers (Austin)

See y'all in Austin!

The Deli's Staff


Show Alert: Gymshorts, The TeleVibes, and Randos at Dover Brickhouse

Come February 27th, Dover Brickhouse will be heated up by three premium local New England Psych acts. Gymshorts grabbed the #3 slot in our end of year poll with their scuzzy Surf-Punk. They’re being joined by The Televibes and Randos, from Massachusetts and New Hampshire respectively. The Televibes have a bright punchy sound with absurd amounts of reverb and delay on the vocals. When they all start shouting the chorus of their tune “Washed Up” it makes your head spin in the best way. And if the bands weren’t already trippy enough, there will be a old school liquid light show while the bands play. Check out the Brickhouse’s website for more details. - Paul Jordan Talbot


Sweet Jesus Release You Destroy Yourself

You Destroy Yourself, the first full-length record from Sweet Jesus, was released on February 3 and from the sounds of their first single, this record is ready to punch you straight in the mouth. “The Light of Sun” has great intensity--I particularly liked the intro to the song--drums alone, followed by vocals and drums, then the whole band bursts-in with violent power chords and heavy bass--what’s not to like about that?

You Destroy Yourself was released through Atomic Action Records. For more information about the record, check out Atomic Action’s Facebook page. For more info about Sweet Jesus, click here.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)

Photo credit: Reid Haithcock

 

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Listen-Up: Get Sh**-faced with Horse-Eyed Men

 “SFIS(A)” by Horse-Eyed Men sounds like some kind of strange country version of a Jimmy Buffet song if it were recorded in outer space--and I intend for that to be as much of a compliment as the band (and any readers) will allow. The first time I heard the song, I thought these guys were a weird bunch, but after listening to the track a few times, it has definitely grown on me. They did a great job with production on this track--the reverb on the guitars, airy backing-vocals--they certainly captured the “sh**-faced in space” idea that the chorus professes. I also liked their decision to record in a large theatre--I think that really helped give a big, open sound to the song.

 

For more information about Horse-Eyed Men, check out their Facebook page.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)

 

 

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