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Artist of the Month
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March 2015
Blood Sound
"Nightclub
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mp3
Blood Sound’s post-punk tracks are informed by an audible nostalgia for the dance floors and goth clubs of the latter ‘80s. Their latest LP Nightclub is a hybrid of dark wave and dream pop. Marrying synth-drenched harmonies with emotively vibrant lyricism, the subtle romantics of the band’s debut full-length fit seamlessly with the buzzing percussive backbeats of earlier cuts by Cold Cave (circa Love Comes Close) or The Cure’s “Primary” stripped bare to its core.
 
“TV Synth 1” sets the tone for Nightclub’s narrative with a brief yet textured prelude to “I Don’t Want.” Relatable like an antithesis of The Smiths’ “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out,” Blood Sound’s “I Don’t Want” personifies the complexities of yearning, desire, and loneliness. As frontman Chris Jordan croons “I don’t want the city’s lights to go down/I don’t want to find home,” guitar riffs magnify the weight of his words without casting them melodramatic. The track is a fitting anthem for the passing of youth, failed love, and transition.
 
The buzzing start of “L.A. Punk” explores that thin line between authenticity and commoditization, the song’s instrumentation paying homage in its own way to the early underground and its subsequent subcultures. As if channeling a sedated rendition of Peter Murphy’s tone and diction, “L.A. Punk” is as memorable as it is brooding. “Acid Summer” gives an inward glimpse at the intimate nature of grief, mortality, and memory. When Jordan sings, “The 1980s died that day,” the listener feels it in their gut. It’s undeniable. The connection between what is experienced and how that experience is remembered is amplified by the track’s thumping tempo.
 
“Empty” plays out like the perfect soundtrack to an inevitable breakup, coupling affection with exhaustion, with the synth framing the heart-wrenching truth of lines like “I was too in love to say/that your story was a bore/Now I gave up on bad dreams and endings/beginnings and beginnings.” It offers a viable catharsis for jilted lovers with a penchant for fuzzed-out refrains.
 
“TV Synth 2” precedes the lyrically minimal yet heavy “Embrace” which serves as Nightclub’s melodic memento mori. “Almost” is subdued yet gripping, slowing the momentum of the record in advanced of “TV Synth 3,” which unfolds like a VHS fever dream. “Fake Blood” is evocative, with reverb and a pulsating backbeat that swells as the song progresses. Arguably the darkest track on the album, Jordan’s diction is hypnotic, “Kill your dreams and wait for/the fake blood to pour out.”
 
Ending with the well-placed “Catacombs,” Nightclub’s final track encapsulates the thrill of beginnings and the way one remembers them. Set to a beat reminiscent of Joy Division’s quintessential single “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Catacombs,” much like the songs that precede it, is reason alone to return to Nightclub. - Dianca London Potts

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Paperwhite returns from SXSW to play Baby's All Right tonight (03.25)

It's getting there folks, our patience will soon be rewarded by a sun that's actually warm and a breeze that's actually enjoyable! OK, we aren't there quite yet, but we'll all have an opportunity to actually experience these summery feelings at Paperwhite's show tonight at Baby's All Right. Sister and brother Katie and Ben Marshall (recently featured on Spin as one of the 22 bands to see at SXSW) create electronic pop that has the power to "emanate" summer (or something). Not the unbearably sticky NYC one by the way, but the sublime summers we remember as half dreams from our teen years. Play this, or single "Magic" (streaming below) and you'll realize what we are talking about. Tonight they'll be playing the Indie Shuffle showcase, sharing the stage with Maxo, Moon Bounce and Novelty Daughter.

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Seen at SXSW: Heeney unveils new video + plays two NYC shows in the next month

We were curious to see Brooklyn garage rockers Heeney in action again, after they placed 8th in our Best of NYC Poll for emerging artists, and we caught in them in Austin at Lambert's BBQ during the SESAC SXSW last Wednesday. They produced an impressively tight, powerful and fun show. Mark Fletcher, Max Kagan and Scott Andrews alternated at the lead vocals and backing vocals, but this didn't affect the uniformity of their grunge influenced punk rock. The band recently unveiled this one-shot video for single "In the Mind," and will be back in NYC with two upcoming shows at Aviv on March 27 and at The Studio on April 11.

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The Electric Magpie Robbed on the Road to SXSW

The mod revivalist band, The Electric Magpie recently lost most of their gear and personal items in San Antonio, TX. They've put together an Indiegogo campaign to recoup the financial loss they experienced on their SXSW tour. A list of what they lost is posted below. If you see anything in San Antonio give them a shout at theelectricmagpie@gmail.com.

-Fender Mustang (white with red pickguard)
-Fender Telecaster (natural light wood, old and dirty, with added switches on the control panel)
-Nord 73 key organ
-Squire Jazz Bass (new,white with red pickguard)
-Old silver memory man, (2 prong cord attached, scratched up with a high pitch hum)
-Ibanez classic flange
-Electro Harmonix cathedral
-Fuzz Factory
-Boss tuning pedal
-Spaun snare drum (black and gold)
-Peter's suitcase full of dozens of fantastic floral shirts and such

You can contribute to the band's Indiegogo campaign HERE. Please pay it forward and help The Electric Magpie!

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Positively Not 6th Street: An Extended Article from The Deli's SXSW Print Issue!

Ooh boy y'all, we just picked up boxes containing 10,000 copies of The Deli's SXSW 2015 print issue, featuring the enigmatic and supremely badass Roger Sellers on the cover, and we're about to drop these bitchin' little pieces of literature all over Austin. Chances are you'll find yourself in possession of one or five copies if you're taking part in the festivities, and if not, you can check out the whole thing online here.

As an extra special delicious bonus treat for all you sexy, sexy readers, we've put up an extended version of our article on venues not on 6th Street, which you can read at the link below. Check it on out, and get yourself to some awesome spots that ain't covered in crowds and vomit this SX. Or, at least, a little less crowds and vomit. Have a great fest errbody!

Positively Not 6th Street

By Trevor Talley, photos by Xavier Villalon

If math is a real thing, you’re either on 6th Street in Austin at South By Southwest right now while you’re reading this, or you’re not. That’s just facts, straight to you from your friends at The Deli. We’re glad to be of service to your brain.

If you’re are at South By, and you probably are because we’re handing out 10,000 of these magazines to cool people with haircuts just like you during South By this year, we at The Deli wanted to give you somethin’ useful to use around our fair city through this magazine. Somethin’ that shows you a bit of the town that you might not normally have seen, that gets you wandering the scene and seeing what the whole of our city has to offer. That’s this here article, which is all about venues Not on 6th, because, let’s be honest, those 6th and Red River spots really don’t need much help from anyone to get boots in the door during SXSW.

Austin, though, is a big place these days that stretches far beyond the booze and vomit of 6th Street, and it’s one that’s growing as we speak. Growing, as it were, at the rate of over 100 people every day (an actual fact). Another fact: 100% of the people who move here will not see all of Austin before they leave or, more likely, they die. There’s just too much of it out there for even us locals to see, much less anyone who is only here for a wild week in March.

So to cut down on your researchin’ needs while at SXSW, and to show you a bit about the music scene as it exists in our Hill Country town outside of the primary party areas (which everyone is already pretty damn aware of), here are some excellent venues Not on 6th to give a try. Each and every one is a true representation of the music culture here in Austin, and most certainly worth the trip over. Get to ‘em, and have a great SX y’all.

 

Trailer Space

Website

1401 RoseWood Ave.

Any location that has blue underwear prominently framed on its wall, good pizza next door and an honest-to-god Area 51 arcade cabinet among its many fine public offerings is a place that automatically makes this list. Trailer Space, though, is more than just a spot with good ass video games and the venerable East Side Pies as a next-door neighbor. Set deep on the north end of the East Side, Trailer Space is a record store and music venue with the spirit of the 90s (in Austin, not that other copycat city) alive. By that I mean that they seriously care about local music and creating an authentic experience, and they also carry VHS tapes. Crossing the threshold of this venue bears immediate gifts: local records, loads more records of all kinds, the aforementioned tapes and DVDs, a bunch of scrawny kids hanging about picking through the crates, and music industry shit all over the walls that lets you know you’re not just dealin’ with a bunch of young hipsters into retro music, you’re in a place run by people who’ve actually been there in Austin’s music scene for a long time, and who’ve brought a bunch of awesome shit back to prove it. The shows here are much the same, curated, played and attended by real-deal Austin music lovers. That there is pizza within 10 feet at all times does not hurt, either.

 

///CLICK HERE FOR THE REST OF THE ARTICLE\\\

 

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