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October 2014
Mumblr
"Full Of Snakes
"
mp3

The major takeaway for Mumblr’s new album Full Of Snakes (Fleeting Youth Records) is that it really takes balls to write songs that truly say nothing. As counter intuitive as it may sound, there really is something admirable in using music to not really express all that much. Any jerk with a voice and a few chords can say a whole lot about how their ex is horrible; what really matters is how much of that content is actually worth hearing. And brother, Mumblr has found a way to make saying nothing profound.

On the surface, the album initially sounds like some sort of early 2000’s generic pop-punk; the first song “Got It” opens with that familiar sense of vague, safe anger. It’s very “high school” reminiscent, right off the bat, with lines like “I got it if you want it” and “I’ll invite you to my room.” But as the song closes and we drift into “Sober,” the tone very gradually starts to feel off. It starts to feel a bit weirder, with this sense of reckless abandon that you only hear in a Violent Femmes song. And it’s not that one is true, and the others is not; this album is walking a razor’s edge between the most self-aware of indie post-punk and the obliviousness of adolescent guilty pleasures.

And while that may sound like a chaotic mess, the seventeen-track full-length really is the having-and-eating of one's cake. We get the indulgence of grandiose guitar riffs and over the top shrieks, but with just enough originality in the composition to give it a sense of being slick and even avant-garde. Don’t let the outward sense of crazy abandon fool you - this thing is airtight. And a lot of that can be chalked up to Nick Morrison’s vocals; he brings a real sense of cleverness to the whole thing, in no small part to the fact that he can turn his voice on a dime.

One endlessly fascinating reoccurring theme is the use of repetition in their lyrics, with phrases like the aforementioned “I got it” and “someone’s been sitting in my chair” echoed over and over again, beyond the point of simple parody. It’s that old artistic trope of repeating something until it becomes meaninglessly applied to lyrics, and it’s interesting to hear expressions of youthful angst to become so alien and meaningless.

They take these universal touchstones of adolescences, including the use of “shock” lyrics such as “if God is a woman I’m going to hell” and gleefully drive them into the ground while enjoying the ride. It’s fun, it’s cool, and will leave you thinking more than any other post-punk album in months. And it does so while still being a genuinely fun throwback to a sort of music that you don’t really hear in earnest these days. - Daniel Ludwig


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Best of CMJ 2014: Malatese

From Jake's report of day 3 of the CMJ Music Marathon 2014: "Virginia's Malatese (from Harrisonburg, which JUST makes it into the area of our coverage) plays something that may be referred to as post-no-wave-pre-post-pre-punk music.  Their melodies/jams/grooves/whatever you wanna call 'em are dissonant and aggressive, drowned under a wave of distortion and Travis' noisy vocals.  Their music is already a little strange and head-tilt inducing, but Travis adds this extra little element of weird that brings it to a level of ingenuity.  First of all, he runs his vocals through a 404 sampler, using all the weird delay or pitch bending effects to add this monstrous ambience.  He's also got a generally hilarious stage presence, what with this funny shake dance that he does, all the weird noises he randomly spews out and the funny faces. He's not afraid to look like a little stupid up there because he's having good ol' tortured fun, which in turn means I'm having fun; if he brought it to an even further level of crazy he could be a regular Iggy Pop. "

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Anthony Pirog's video for "The New Electric"

 Anthony Pirog may be the best electric guitarist on the East Coast, and his new album, Palo Colorado Dream, is his best work yet. The album covers as much ground as the electric guitar allows, and is impossible to describe in just a few words. One could call it "avant" something, like "jazz" or "indie," but what it really is is Anthony Pirog incarnate. The guitar has become an extension of the man, his technical brilliance limited only by his fantastic imagination. How Anthony found time to craft such a gem is a mystery, as he's the most in demand guitarist in the area, part of countless other projects. Yet craft this he did, and it's gorgeous, and he made a video to go along with it too. Check out the video below, and follow the link to the album above for more. Take some time with it; you wont be disappointed. --Natan Press

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Baby Bry Bry releases new EP, I Learned to Drown Myself Out, Part I.

 It's finally here! Last night, Baby Bry Bry & The Apologists played the release show for their new "single," a four song digital/casette release titled I Learned to Drown Myself Out, Part I (Part II is coming "soon"--I want it NOW!). Baby Bry Bry's live shows are action packed and exhilarating. The Apologists, some of the most accomplished musicians in DC, provide the rocket fuel that launches Bry Bry's stage presence into the stratosphere. Every show wins an entire new room full of fans, and as the rooms get bigger, they stay just as crowded with crazy kids rocking their faces off. It's been a year since Bry Bry's last release, Is It Anything Or Is It Everything, but it feels longer. 

Bry Bry's style is all over the place, ranging from blue-eyed soul to wild and crazy punk, and the first two songs off I Learned to Drown Myself Out, Part I are a perfect example of his range. "Lately"  starts similarly to Nirvana's "Territorial Pissings," and for about a minute it's a straight up old-school punk-rocker. But then there's a little bridge with a sweet vocal melody and background harmonies. And then a vicious guitar solo. And then more sweetness.

"Just Because It's Art (Doesn't Mean It's Good)" could be on a late Ween album, or The Pretenders. It's a dancey island kind of thing. Yacht-rocky, but with punk-rock sounds. Humorous and hummable and head-bobbing good, with some fun changes throughout.

If you get the cassette you also get a cover of Big Black's "Bad Penny" and a song called "Slumzzz." There are only 50 copies of the cassette, and a lot of them got scooped up at the show, so ACT NOW! --Natan Press

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DJ Wise B Prepares To Remaster His Mixtape Called I.F.O

Rashad Brockington, better known on the 1s and 2s as DJ Wise B, is gearing up to remaster the latest EP off his record label, called I.F.O. Inspiration For Others. DJ Wise B prides himself on spinning an energy packed set, go-go style. “It’s interactive, a call and repeat with the people in the crowd,” describes the DMV native. The 22-year old turntablist and hip-hop producer started DJ-ing thanks to his pops challenging him to a rap battle- winner gets to pursue a rap career. Brockington lost the battle, but was gifted with a set of turntables instead. “My dad said everybody needs a DJ.” Daddy knows best! Brockington now runs the music label CAMP 421 and has acquired the rapper Supreme Elite, but is looking to reach others outside of the hip-hop persuasion. “I want street artists and opera singers all kinds of artists” envisions Brockington. Supreme Elite and DJ Wise B will release their two-point-oh version of the I.F.O. EP in early November on Spotify, Pandora, and iTunes. Until then, take a listen to the heavy bass and driving trap beats of the original I.F.O EP below. –Sade A. Spence

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