x
Artist of the Month
the_deli_magazine

 
deli cover

March 2015
Blood Sound
"Nightclub
"
mp3
Blood Sound’s post-punk tracks are informed by an audible nostalgia for the dance floors and goth clubs of the latter ‘80s. Their latest LP Nightclub is a hybrid of dark wave and dream pop. Marrying synth-drenched harmonies with emotively vibrant lyricism, the subtle romantics of the band’s debut full-length fit seamlessly with the buzzing percussive backbeats of earlier cuts by Cold Cave (circa Love Comes Close) or The Cure’s “Primary” stripped bare to its core.
 
“TV Synth 1” sets the tone for Nightclub’s narrative with a brief yet textured prelude to “I Don’t Want.” Relatable like an antithesis of The Smiths’ “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out,” Blood Sound’s “I Don’t Want” personifies the complexities of yearning, desire, and loneliness. As frontman Chris Jordan croons “I don’t want the city’s lights to go down/I don’t want to find home,” guitar riffs magnify the weight of his words without casting them melodramatic. The track is a fitting anthem for the passing of youth, failed love, and transition.
 
The buzzing start of “L.A. Punk” explores that thin line between authenticity and commoditization, the song’s instrumentation paying homage in its own way to the early underground and its subsequent subcultures. As if channeling a sedated rendition of Peter Murphy’s tone and diction, “L.A. Punk” is as memorable as it is brooding. “Acid Summer” gives an inward glimpse at the intimate nature of grief, mortality, and memory. When Jordan sings, “The 1980s died that day,” the listener feels it in their gut. It’s undeniable. The connection between what is experienced and how that experience is remembered is amplified by the track’s thumping tempo.
 
“Empty” plays out like the perfect soundtrack to an inevitable breakup, coupling affection with exhaustion, with the synth framing the heart-wrenching truth of lines like “I was too in love to say/that your story was a bore/Now I gave up on bad dreams and endings/beginnings and beginnings.” It offers a viable catharsis for jilted lovers with a penchant for fuzzed-out refrains.
 
“TV Synth 2” precedes the lyrically minimal yet heavy “Embrace” which serves as Nightclub’s melodic memento mori. “Almost” is subdued yet gripping, slowing the momentum of the record in advanced of “TV Synth 3,” which unfolds like a VHS fever dream. “Fake Blood” is evocative, with reverb and a pulsating backbeat that swells as the song progresses. Arguably the darkest track on the album, Jordan’s diction is hypnotic, “Kill your dreams and wait for/the fake blood to pour out.”
 
Ending with the well-placed “Catacombs,” Nightclub’s final track encapsulates the thrill of beginnings and the way one remembers them. Set to a beat reminiscent of Joy Division’s quintessential single “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” “Catacombs,” much like the songs that precede it, is reason alone to return to Nightclub. - Dianca London Potts

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

scene blog

washington

The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Sleepwalkers launch tour, play Jammin' Java March 1st.

The fantabulous Sleepwalkers are playing Jammin' Java on on March 1st! YES! They're opening up for Ithaca's Jimkata, so it's gonna be a huge trippy party, which is a great scene in which to enjoy Sleepwalkers' dirty pop/psych-rock amazingness.

For those of us living close to DC, we've had to enjoy Sleepwalkers' rise through the Richmond scene from afar, listening to their brilliant album, Greenwood Shade, or watching videos of their live shows. Now they're here! And Jammin' Java will be just the first stop on a two month tour that will take them througout the Midwest and South. Exciting times! Don't miss the beggining of a great career, at Jammin' Java, March 1st, doors at 8:30, $10.

It's hard to pick which song I want to stream here. There's at least 5 singles on the album, and they're all different. I'm gonna pick the second track, "Breaking My Heart," cause I'm feelin' it right now. Sounds a lot like Moby Grape's "Going Nowhere" mixed with some psychedelic power-pop like the Lemon Pipers. Or something. Seriously, listen to the whole thing.  --Natan Press

|

New Walking Sticks video for "You Got What You Wanted"

The Walking Sticks give us what we want (I had to), premiering a new video for "You Got What You Wanted" on DCist today. Made on an iphone, it features what looks to be a single shot walk through a snow-covered wood with the snow falling. The creative minds of The Walking Sticks have managed to turn the otherwise dreary and upsetting weather into something beautiful and mystical. Thank you.

The song itself is pretty sexy. Like Portishead sexy, where the sex is kind of angry/frustrated/despairing sex (because, in this case, it seems, the sex is too addictive to escape). The music does not share the sexy gloom of a "Wandering Star" however. A beautiful organ leads the pretty sounds that fall about it like soft white snowflakes. The track, like the video, is filled with brightness, and Chelsea Lee's crystal voice. "Can't stop loving the high" indeed. --Natan Press

|

New video from The North Country for "The Cross We Bear"

Huzzah! The North Country have released a video for "The Cross We Bear," a single off their upcoming album There Is Nothing To Fear. The video shows the day in the life of a wooden artist's mannequin-cum-Everyman who's got just the dreariest life. I don't want top ruin the ending for you, but he gets out of his rut with the help of a skateboarding apatosaurus and some acid. Also serendipitous love.

The North Country is hittin' the road this April, with dates through the mid-atantic and South (and a couple stops in Texas), spreading the glory of the DC DIT scene far and wide. You should really go see them. --Natan Press 

|

Pompeii Graffiti tugs at your "Heartstrings" on Valentine's Day single.

You know when you're at a house-show in DC, for a "DIT" festival, and you run into that special someone? That someone who plays some sort of custom-looking 6-string with flatwounds as a bass (when he's not on the pedal steel) in a band with a killer cellist? It's one of those "at first sight" things you hear about from the motion pictures. 

Ahren Buchheister isn't the only member of Pompeii Graffiti, Pony Bones (the band I saw at The Paperhaus on that glorious day), or Black Rhinoceros, but he's the common factor that binds this Annapolis supergroup, like (dare I say it?) heartstrings, together in this lovely video. Ahren himself is on lead vox and guitar. Fret not, Ahren, I dig you "not only for your music skills."

But they are, like, a huge deal. Happy Valentine's Deli readers! --Natan Press


|
|

aom
Which of these local acts should be The Deli Philly's featured artist(s)?

[sponsored by]




fancy
aps
stompbox exhibit


- news for musician and music industry peeps -