x
Artist of the Month
the_deli_magazine

 
deli cover

 

 

September 2015
Lithuania
"Hardcore Friends
"
mp3
Lithuania’s debut full-length album Hardcore Friends via Lame-O Records begins with the mad-dashing punk jolt of “God In Two Persons.” The song quickly gathers momentum as a rush of power chords and percussion develop an instantaneous flow of energy, and Eric Slick’s controlled agitation questions and states, “What is on your mind?/You do it all the time.” “Pieces” pushes a crusty grunge aesthetic, as the spoken lyrics linger, embedding them in one’s mind. “I need something that I can’t hold on to./Please believe I would never do you wrong.” What initially speaks to a fundamental instrumental rawness is balanced by a melodic refinement.
 
Dominic Angelella unlocks the window of vulnerability in “I Wanna Drink Poison.”  A simple percussion and guitar allow his delicate vocals to etch a confession that aches with authenticity. Eventually, the light breeze of instrumentation transforms into a powerful gust, and Angelella laments, “I Don’t See Anybody.” With it’s bare acoustic guitar lead, “Coronation Day” provides an uplifting tonal change - a brief yet well-placed breath of fresh air. “Deaf Gene” begins with a gentle drifting before reaching a high-pressure, uncorked rage -  “…My hands are tired it’s the first time since time…” releasing the frustration until Angelella’s vocals soothe Slick’s aggression giving it a moment to simmer before relinquishing the reins and roaring to its conclusion.   
 
Densely packed drums and guitar quickly rouse one’s senses in “Place Of No Tomorrow,” revving the engine between short yet effective exhibitions of force. Its vocals are exuberant, while still having a disgruntled bite as that universally need for a new scene appears in the chorus reverberates, “God, this part of town is killing me./I need to breathe and see the place of no tomorrow.” Closing with its title track, Hardcore Friends leaves a lasting impression. As Angelella poignantly questions, “If I fall in love with an idea again, if I fall in love, would you make sure that I’m careful with it?” The guest vocals of Frances Quinlan (Hop Along) and Rachel Browne (Field Mouse/Anomie) offer a dynamic sense of earnest support as the album rumbles to a close.
 
A pair of hardcore friends in Eric Slick and Dominic Angelella has sealed its brotherly bond with an album that fuses punk-rock attitude and assertiveness with a resounding melodic pop sensibility. The energy and emotion are palpable. - Michael Colavita

Rate the Artist:


Please visit The Deli's full web charts organized by genre and region.


Go to Charts

Cancel

scene blog

Album Review: We’re Here to Help - Notekillers

Album Review: We’re Here to Help - Notekillers

Listening to an instrumental outfit can sometimes seem off-putting. There’s a certain tedium that most fall to - a recurring loop of indistinguishable murmurs, buzzes, and kicks that drone on into oblivion. Really, it can get pretty damn boring if you’re absolutely restless and need some type of vocal interaction - or if you’re just not into musical circle jerks. Fortunately, though, instrumental avant-rock trio the Notekillers fails at the ennui and mundane on their first full-length, We’re Here to Help.
 
We’re Here to Help was over 30 years in the making. The dual-habituating Notekillers (they’re from Philadelphia and Brooklyn) thrashed it out with the superlative no-wave instigators in late ‘70s New York City, only officially dropping the self-released 7-inch, The Zipper. The record unknowingly culled major players as fans for the trio. Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore cited the Notekillers as a “big influence” for him and others in his evolving music scene in an interview with Mojo Magazine (the trio eventually made an archival release on Moore's Ecstatic Peace! label).
 
We're Here to Help, released on Prophase Music, is both an extension of and break away from The Zipper. Its erratic behavior is more developed, but still has that experimental free-spirit which helped to shape a generation and music genre. There's chaos and there's refinement, zeal and calm. We're Here to Help is a multi-layered and complex album made up of star-burst moments that fly every which way in bright spurts, but there's still a very distinct pattern. While fierce, wild arrangements are always present throughout this nearly 40-minute effort, not every song is a sonic freak-out like the album's definitive track, "Flamenco" - a raucous number where the guitars shred furiously to the point of a high-pitched fever and havoc is unleashed on the skins. "Eyelash" curls to the surf rock mystique that the Notekillers might be best known for, with rumbling guitars and rolling drums powering into a catchy, rhythmic melody, and if this track strikes your fancy, then face-melter "Papers" may have the angular riffs and walls of distortion that are here to help make your day. We're Here to Help proves that the stigma of instrumental rock is something to be defied. - Annamarya Scaccia

Eyelash by Notekillers 

Flamenco by Notekillers 

|
|

aom

New Poll Coming Soon!

[sponsored by]


aps
stompbox exhibit


- news for musician and music pros -